January 12th, 2006

Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media

by

There is so much wrong with the blogger view that the monoliths of old media will be brought down and consumers will bask in the glory of infinite media choice — discussing, creating, tagging, rating (meta-ing) each other’s content in one big solipsistic frenzy. Everyone can create media. Everyone controls their own media. Everyone is media. Everything is conversation. Complete entropy. Complete harmony.

Please.

(UPDATE: Keep reading the original post, but please also see the update at the end.)

Technology has brought about radical change, but the one thing that can and never will change is human nature — that’s the wild card that the digital cognoscenti are forgetting.

In the latest round, Jon Fine in his BW column suggests that Old Media can push back against Google by walling off their content. Jeff Jarvis argues that this would be “stupid” because:

Google is everyone’s front page. And, yes, that can make life difficult. Google kills brands; Google commodifies everything.

This is so completely out of touch with the average person’s media consumption habits, and with basic human nature. (As out of touch as the people who are still skeptical that anyone would click on a Google ad — or Bush 41 before he discovered the supermarket scanner — bloggers need to get out and talk to some people who shop at Walmart, i.e. almost everyone.) It assumes that the average person knows exactly what they want and when they want it, and that they use Google to hone in on it, like a seagull diving at the ocean to snag a fish.

But the truth is that most people are drowning in an ocean of infinite media (the blogosphere being the perfect storm). Even the bloggers are drowning. Read Bill Burnham’s 5-step program for people who subscribe to so many RSS feeds they don’t have time to go to the bathroom. He even coins a phrase for it: Feed Overload Syndrome.

Here’s why the open-web, Web 2.0, infinite media theory goes against human nature — this is from the Publisher’s Weekly review of The Paradox of Choice:

Like Thoreau and the band Devo, psychology professor Schwartz provides ample evidence that we are faced with far too many choices on a daily basis, providing an illusion of a multitude of options when few honestly different ones actually exist. The conclusions Schwartz draws will be familiar to anyone who has flipped through 900 eerily similar channels of cable television only to find that nothing good is on. Whether choosing a health-care plan, choosing a college class or even buying a pair of jeans, Schwartz, drawing extensively on his own work in the social sciences, shows that a bewildering array of choices floods our exhausted brains, ultimately restricting instead of freeing us.

Jon is right. There is a backlash coming. But not from Big Old Media. It’s coming from the consumer, who is about to rebel against the overabundance of media.

Let’s say I’m the average person who wants to see what blogs are all about. I’m interested in health and wellness. Where do I go to find the best blogs on this topic? Technorati? Even in the very unlikely event I’ve heard of Technorati (the name is so off putting), a search of Health and Wellness produces a list of random blog posts, including many in Asian languages. (Did you know there is an entire blog about thrush?) I’m going to give up Prevention magazine for this?

It’s not the democratic web. It’s the anarchic web.

Last night, my wife asked me, What is RSS? She’s a highly-educated, board-certified pediatrician, who spends about as much time as the average person surfing the web. And the only reason she asked is because she saw it on my blog! Bloggers and everyone else frothing over RSS are living in a hall of mirrors — you can’t see the average person.

How long has RSS been around? Three years? Five years? And still the adoption rate is only about 5%. For the average person, the ability to subscribe to an infinite number of content sources is not a panacea. It’s punishment.

Granted, the business models of Old Media are coming apart at the seams. “Static media” won’t survive. But don’t count out the Old Media brands just yet. There’s hope for Disney, Wall Street Journal, and maybe even Lady’s Home Journal.

People want a filter. They want someone to tell them what’s important, what matters. They don’t have the energy or the time or the wherewithal to figure it out themselves. People are willing to sacrifice some freedom to live (what they perceive to be) a comfortable existence. (How else could Bush have gotten reelected?) “Walled gardens” online may well be at risk, as Bill Burnham argues, but consumers may not be ready to exit Eden — at least there’s the illusion that you can trust what you find.

There’s a reason why most people find the accuracy of Wikipedia so astonishing. They can’t fathom that throwing open control to the masses doesn’t lead to chaos. The general public doesn’t really trust itself. There’s a reason why the “Founding Fathers,” with all their democratic zeal, didn’t make the president electable by popular vote (remember, Bush won the popular vote in 2004). There’s reason why when people need surgery they don’t invite all their friends over and hand out scalpels.

If the Old Media brands don’t survive, a new hegemony will take it’s place. (After all, Google is the #3 most trusted source of content on the Web, even though they don’t make any.)

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. Marx thought he was on to something, but he had people all wrong.

If there really is a Matrix, we’ll never figure it out.

UPDATE:
I suppose I asked for it when I chose such an “in your face” title — but given that this post has gotten so much more attention than my more sober posts, it proves the rule that the blogosphere thrives on controversy (and perhaps enjoys tearing down more than building up, although it’s very good at both). If I had it to do again, I might chose a more polite, less extreme title, but then I probably wouldn’t get as much attention. (My more conciliatory posts certainly haven’t gotten this kind of attention; I’m much more eager for feedback on this one: Media Should Start With Conversation, Then Synthesis.)

That said, this “rant” is born out of genuine frustration with my own personal experience as a consumer of new media and with the lack of concern that many in the blogosphere have for the risk of frustration and backlash (and, granted, far from everyone — I have no illusion that all bloggers hold the view I’m arguing against). Anyone who thinks that this extreme view of the future of media does not exist out there should spend some more time surfing around. (The touchiness at this obvious stereotype perhaps proves there is a grain of truth — if I titled a post “All Bloggers Are Ugly and Smell Bad” everyone would have ignored it as an obvious absurdity.)

As to the substance of the argument, it is NOT in support of Old Media (I’m amazed at the eagerness to stereotype me as a defender of Old Media based on where I work — bloggers should watch out for that glass house). I believe, along with the rest of the blogosphere, that Old Media economics are coming apart at the seams and that complacency is not an option. And I believe that the evolution in media brought about by technology will ultimately be a very good thing. Media needs to change, and I support the blogosphere as an effective agent of change (otherwise I wouldn’t be blogging!).

But I also believe that many in the blogosphere are wrong that the future of media will be the online version of communism. As an agent of change, the blogosphere needs to be careful that it doesn’t turn off the individuals that it is championing. I’m worried about how people will navigate the proliferation of new media and new voices — I personally find it quite overwhelming. Which doesn’t mean we should cling to the old model. But the new model needs to give some thought to its “user-friendliness.” Citizen journalism is wonderful, but to truly serve the citizens, it needs to be navigable and consumable by the average person.

I think the answer lies somewhere between the two extremes. In another post I lay out a case for how New Media and Old Media can work together and achieve (heaven help us) synergy.

Comments (52 Responses so far)

  1. The ‘Old Media’ rebuttal to the noisy blogosphere I’ve recently been hearing ‘Old Media’ defending itself against the noisy blogosphere ( Scott Karp of Atlantic Monthly, Simon Waldman of The Guardian, among others). I think they’re tired of hearing condescending chatter from people who don’t know what it looks like inside today’s media company.

  2. I’ve recently been hearing “Old Media” defending itself against the noisy blogosphere ( Scott Karp of Atlantic Monthly, Simon Waldman of The Guardian, among others). I think they’re tired of hearing condescending chatter from people who don’t know what it looks like inside today’s media company.

  3. Publishing 2.0 » Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media People want a filter. They want someone to tell them what’s important, what matters. They don’t have the energy or the time or the wherewithal to figure it out themselves. [IMG]

  4. rant against the Old Media doomsayers

  5. Not all bloggers think MSM will be brought down or hate it. I’m one of them. I think it will transform itself and then gobble up as much of the top tier of the blogosphere as it can. To read Karp’s perspective, see ” Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media. “

  6. [IMG webtwodotoh.jpg]A recent post by Scott Karp reminded me of the communication gap that sometimes characterizes debates about the future of media. While Scott raises some good points in “Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media”, I think he misses or dismisses some important ones by

  7. It’s not quite a Bloggers and Old Media lovefest yet, but at least people seem to have eased up on the ‘us vs them’ rhetoric. AdAge.com has a nice article explaining why Blogging vs. Traditional Media has been oversold. Scott Karp’s recent post entitled Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media raised some hackles, but in a follow-up post he explains that (in his view) New Media has the conversations but Old Media has synthesis. As I emailed Scott, I think he raises some interesting points – but I still don’t quite agree.

  8. it to ruminate on the interface between New Media (blogging) and Old Media. Read his About page because I’m too lazy to parse it all out for ya. Overall, he’s really thinking about this whole thing–really thinking. Go take a look. I commented on Bloggers are So Wrong About Media because in it Scott seems to assume that all bloggers are created equal–and all of y’all know that some bloggers (mainly the A-list) are more equal than the rest of us around here. (and don’t say we’re not. don’t piss on my shoe and tell me it’s

  9. Media Should Start With Conversation, Then Synthesis は、「Web 2.0 vs オールドメディア」という対立の構図そのものに問題を見て取る。実はその前に Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media という記事を書き、その中で There is so much wrong with the blogger view that the monoliths of old media will be brought down and consumers will bask in the glory of infinite media choice — discussing, creating, tagging, rating

  10. » Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media

  11. “Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media”

  12. A Firefox extension that automatically converts all foreign currencies on a web page into your currency using live exchange rates. Feed Overload Syndrome: 5 Reccomended Ways To Cure It Fighting RSS feed overload. Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media Interesting read. Bangladesh to curb ‘vulgar’ calls Bangladeshi authorities have ordered mobile phone operators to stop offering free calls after midnight, to protect the morals of young people. Uhh..

  13. and as usual Mike Arrington gets to the crux of the issues in his analysis: “…the site is poorly designed, very cluttered and doesn’t clearly state what they are doing.” – Matt McAlister responds to the “Old Media”rebuttal to the noisy blogosphere (“I don’t think the critical blogosphere noise will stop until Old Media invests in the new user interaction models rather than continue its fight to preserve traditional advertising metrics.”)

  14. EPIC 2014 What will the world, the media, look like in 2014? Using prototype.js v1.4.0 Reference for the Prototype JavaScript library Greg Yardley?s Internet Blog » Yahoo?s counterproductive pyramidPublishing 2.0 » Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media There’s too much choice on the net. There are millions of blogs, and that makes it difficult to find a good article. ABC Music – coldplay – trouble – free sheet music download Coldplay Midi

  15. EPIC 2014 What will the world, the media, look like in 2014? Using prototype.js v1.4.0 Reference for the Prototype JavaScript library Greg Yardley?s Internet Blog » Yahoo?s counterproductive pyramidPublishing 2.0 » Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media There’s too much choice on the net. There are millions of blogs, and that makes it difficult to find a good article. ABC Music – coldplay – trouble – free sheet music download Coldplay Midi

  16. MiniMediaGuy: November 2005 Archives Another possible anchor, with more new media ? appeal would be a store to … is their business ” their business is not the publishing modalities they use … Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media ” Publishing 2.0 Old Media has hindered itself by avoiding real innovation. … Old media has to at some point make some concessions as does the blogosphere. … New Times SLO :: Publishing Local News and Entertainment for over 18 years in San Luis Obispo County

  17. Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media I’m interested in health and wellness. Where do I go to find the best blogs on this topic? Technorati? Even in the very unlikely event I’ve heard of Technorati (the name is so off putting), a search of Health and Wellness produces a list of random

  18. I actually agree that editorial filters will remain very important and thus many, if not all, of the “old media” brands should survive. The interesting questions for the “old media” players become: how do I deal with the destruction of some revenue sources (such as classifieds), how do incorporate new channels, how do I differentiate my viewer experience vs. technologically driven “filters” (which are bound to become much better). It will be interesting to see how it all plays out.

  19. If consumers are overwhelmed think of the poor advertiser. Somebody will need to filter those choices to find the ones that deliver on the client’s expectations.

    And advertising is a long tail business. Big advertisers aren’t of one mind and over half of all ad spends happens locally and regionally. So who’s got the long tail organization to filter and shape each client’s best buy?

  20. [...] This is what the blogosphere fails to realize about the old media model — people value authority, or probably a better word is judgment. Slashdot newsworthiness or Wikipedia acuracy is determined by the judgment of a relatively small number of dedicated, knowledgeable people (the blogosphere won’t call them editors, but that’s what they are.) [...]

  21. [...] Drawing on my complaint about the overabundance of media, Lloyd Shepherd took the thinking a quantum leap forward in his post, Kicking against overabundance?: Take podcasting. I find it acutely difficult to find really good podcast juice without wading through an awful, awful lot of garbage. Somebody needs to package this stuff up. Somebody needs to make a podcast brand which I can associate with and give some trust to, that I can rely on to find me the good stuff and let me get on with my life. Google isn’t doing it. iTunes could do it, but doesn’t seem to have the resource. And I don’t want to have to wait until all my friends are sufficiently into podcasting so that they can share their good stuff in some social media stylee. I want the Guardian (or the Times, or the Telegraph, or the Sun, choose your colour) to do it for me. [...]

  22. I call these filters reconstructors (more at my blog)…thanks for the very enjoyable post.

  23. [...] Subscribe to the feed About the author Heiko Hebig lives and works in Hamburg, Germany. While I have been affiliated with various Internet consultancies and software companies, opinion expressed here is strictly private. Questions? Comments? Send me an . » more about me » Technorati Profile You are here: Home > Weblog Archive > Sunday link tip Earlier entry: « Meet Anina Sunday link tip posted on 15. January 2006 at 02:49 PM Read this: Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media. And then go out and enjoy the lovely Sunday afternoon. Enjoy the sunshine. Think about walled gardens, echo chambers and halls of mirrors. Inhale. Exhale. Reboot your brain. Comments to this weblog entry: TrackBack URL for this entry: http://www.hebig.com/mt/mt-tb.cgi/2822 Post a new comment If you want to leave a comment, I would like to know who you are. Your email address will not appear on the site as plain text – so spam bots can’t harvest your address. Your IP will be logged. If you think this imposes an invasion of your privacy, do not leave a comment. LinkSpam and/or commercial messages will be deleted. [...]

  24. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media I’m interested in health and wellness. Where do I go to find the best blogs on this topic? Technorati? Even in the very unlikely event I’ve heard of Technorati (the name is so off putting), a search of Health and Wellness produces a list of random blog posts, including many in Asian languages. That is what vertical blog aggregation/news collection services are becoming so popular. Blogs and blogging were part of evolution of media 1.0, tags, aggregation and memeorandum are a notch above (web 2.0?). Blogs are not the end-all for traditional media, but I dislike the fact that doom-sayers look at a possible problem and never turn to look at possible solutions. Why can’t traditional media and popular dynamic media complement each other? Technorati Tags: web 2   [...]

  25. [...] The problem with the current debate over Old Media vs. New Media is that most people see it in binary terms — either Old Media dies and the web becomes a completely open marketplace of commoditized content (as Jeff Jarvis and countless others of have argued), or consumers rebel and cling to the structures of Old Media. [...]

  26. Google is the #3 most trusted source of content on the Web

    Where do you have this number from? Sounds like an interesting survey. Can you provide a link?

  27. [...] This guy says bloggers are wrong about mainstream media, but then for the most part, he doesn’t say which bloggers he’s talking about. MSM has a place, but they can’t ignore the pressure blogs create for them to be more disciplined and to work harder to report what’s happening instead of reporting conventional wisdom. The profession of journalism has gotten lazy, preferring to report controversy on issues where there is only idiocy and not a meaningful debate over facts. This has led to a political meltdown in the US, with a major city in ruins and more and more of our spending happening in a faraway country of little significance to our interests. The press even admits culpability, and yet we still debate whether bloggers are right or wrong in predicting their demise. Well, I don’t know who predicted it, but as I’ve said many times here they don’t seem to need anyone’s help in their aspiration for oblivion, they seem to be doing just fine on their own. &nbsp [...]

  28. [...] list, but tabbed browsing is my favourite new feature., all wrapped up in a gorgeous new interface. #  copy [...]

  29. Hi Scott,

    Interesting diatride…but methinks you may want to spend a bit more time in the Techonrati long tail to find out what the non-A-list bloggers think about what they (me included) are doing.

    It’s not necessarily that we are overthowing old media. We know we have little clout to counter that juggernaut. And there are few of us who are striving to be ‘authoritative’ blogs because we know that the ‘authoritative’ bloggers have been either blogging for a very long time (in blogyears–think of the equivalent as dogyears) or are media, p/r or tech personages themselves.

    The rest of us–hencforth known as the blogging rabble–are making conversation with one another as well as with the world. We aren’t making big media, we’re increasing a kind of social media. If we provide some content, perhaps a link, to a story that someone else might find helpful, that’s great, but that isn’t really our purpose or point. If we happen to do something to change media business models, that’s cool–but we know that we’re small potatoes and can be crushed pretty quickly.

    So, when you talk about the “blogger view,” take a minute to check out some of us who aren’t big media personages who blog. Our view of the blogosphere is just a tad different.

  30. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media publishing2.com Found 1 day ago There is so much wrong with the blogger view that the monoliths of old media will be brought down and consumers will bask in the glory of infinite media choice — discussing, creating, tagging, rating (meta-ing) each other’s content in one big solipsistic frenzy. Technology has brought about radical … 7 inbound permalink Tagged: rss internet [...]

  31. [...] Scott Karp, the managing director of research and strategy for Atlantic Media (which publishes Atlantic Monthly, among other things) gets on a bit of a rant about bloggers and the “mainstream” media. For a guy whose blog is called Publishing 2.0, I find Scott’s vituperation about blogging a little over the top. Yes, it’s true that the blogosphere can be a bit of a funhouse-mirror sometimes, and it’s also true that some zealots take the open-media, everyone-is-a-content-creator thing a little too far. [...]

  32. [...] 16 Jan ’06 – + 0 – 0 “Bloggers are so wrong about the media” Een frisse tegenwind uit Blogosfeer. Lees het artikel `Bloggers are so wrong about the media` van Scott Karp. [...]

  33. I quote: “And still the adoption rate is only about 5%.”

    Nope. It is about 30%. Most RSS users don’t realize they using RSS. See: http://blogs.msdn.com/alexbarn/archive/2006/01/01/508494.aspx

  34. Alex, what is the value of technology adopters who don’t know they’ve adopted the technology? When that 25% using RSS without knowing it come to a site and see an invitation to subscribe to RSS, they are unlikely to do so because they DON’T KNOW that it fits with what they are already doing. Can you think of another technology that was widely adopted without people knowing it?

    With all due respect, too many defenses of RSS sound apologist.

  35. Scott, who cares if the users ‘know’ what technology they are using? Do people who read newspapers understand the printing technology that goes into creating the newspaper in their hand? Should they? Or the technology behind TV, or mobile phones or wi-fi?

    Your wife asked: what is RSS? She’s in the minority. Most don’t even ask the question.

    Another thought: mass online media uses RSS. So what?

    btw, I’m not sure what this point around RSS has to do with the context of your post? What’s the point you’re trying to make (or didn’t make) with the data?

    As an FYI, RSS will move to around 90% by the time IE7 has taken it to the masses. Will users know they are using ‘RSS’? Nope. Most will just be subscribing to content. That’s all they’ll care about, not the acronym nor the technology behind it.

  36. Alex, first, most sites — blogs and mainstream media — still use the term “RSS” — as they long as they do, it matters a whole lot whether people know what that is!

    If six or seven years ago someone handed you a mobile phone and told you it was a “peripatetic communications facilitator,” you would have said, huh? Fortunately, the creators of the technology called it a phone. It doesn’t matter how the technology works. But it sure matters whether people know what they are using and what it does.

    As to the point I was trying to make, I’m suffering from RSS feed overload, and I’m sure many others are too. There has to be some filtering, not just a clarion call to subscribe. That’s the risk of RSS’ simplicity (which IE7 will only exacerbate) — if people OD on RSS subscriptions, it will start to feel like clutter and they’ll stop using it, much to the detriment of all.

    And it’s condescending to assume that the majority of people don’t know what RSS is and don’t care. People are smart enough to notice the term “RSS” on every site — the Yahoo research proves they don’t know what it means, but I bet most of them are wondering.

  37. “Old Media” has hindered itself by avoiding real innovation. Seriously considering new models for distribution wouldn’t, as Scoot suggest, amount to “Communism” but rather create new revenue streams. “Old media” has to at some point make some concessions as does the blogosphere. Old Media is too unilateral. The “we write it; you buy it” model for publishing is on its last leg. However, blogs, wikis, bitpass (digital content distribution) and the like will die before they reach maturity if they don’t find a way to monetize content in a way that makes sense and cents. So far no one has done this short of the itunes music store.

  38. Elliott, I am by no means advocating against the evolution of new models — I’m using one right now. I completely agree that Old Media is too unilateral. I just think that as we ride the new media wave we need to be wary of the consequences for the average media consumer. I’m fully in favor of an open marketplace of content — I just think New Media has not spent enough time thinking about the best way to help consumers navigate it. I’m actually not worried that New Media will find innovative ways to monetize their value — I just hope the average person will come along for the ride.

  39. Opinions opinions. All everyone is giving are opinions. The problem is solved when you do not strive for mass attention. If you would reach millions with your journalistic opinion would you be able to read all the reactions?
    You have a point but as Sgt. Shutup used to say: Oh dear, how sad… never mind.

  40. Frank, you may be privy to “the truth,” but all I have is my opinion. That’s how constructive debate works. You give your opinion. I give mine. And maybe, just maybe, we might get somewhere.

  41. [...] 看樣子台灣的部落格圈比較有效率(比較沒活力?),早早就吵完了。Publishing 2.0 » Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media Publishing 2.0 » Media Should Start With Conversation, Then Synthesis BuzzMachine » Blog Archive » The value of scoops vs. collaboration Why we keep secrets in the mainstream press 不過回頭想想….在美國吵的這些人都是有錢有勢的大喀,而且年紀都也都不小了,還那麼血氣方剛真不容易。在美國,說不定真的就這樣吵著吵著就有糖吃了,在台灣,給吃屎的機率比較高。也難怪有些人會有這樣的感覺了,其實非常貼切呢:Rough Type: Nicholas Carr’s Blog: Memeomainstream 「Sometimes I think that if it weren’t for the shadow of the cathedral, there’d be no place to set up the bazaar.」 Posted by portnoy at 2006年01月17日 13:30 Comments Post a comment [...]

  42. Blogging, new technology, and the general populace…

    I was doing my typical blog/site hopping, moving from one story or article to another, when I came across Publishing 2.0 . The first post I read over was Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media . As you might be able to tell from the title, it’s his opini…

  43. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media – There is so much wrong with the blogger view that the monoliths of old media will be brought down and consumers will bask in the glory of infinite media choice — discussing, creating, tagging, rating (meta-ing) each other’s content in one big solipsistic frenzy. Technology has brought about radical … # 30 inbound permalink Tagged: google [...]

  44. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media I’m interested in health and wellness. Where do I go to find the best blogs on this topic? Technorati? Even in the very unlikely event I’ve heard of Technorati (the name is so off putting), a search of Health and Wellness produces a list of random blog posts, including many in Asian languages. That is what vertical blog aggregation/news collection services are becoming so popular. Blogs and blogging were part of evolution of media 1.0, tags, aggregation and memeorandum are a notch above (web 2.0?). Blogs are not the end-all for traditional media, but I dislike the fact that doom-sayers look at a possible problem and never turn to look at possible solutions. Why can’t traditional media and popular dynamic media complement each other? [...]

  45. [...] Blogs started in that last category.    However, as more journalists self-publish and more discovery is taking place via blogs (think Flickr), the middle is shrinking, causing some to say that mainstream media is dead.   I prefer Scott Karp’s rebuttal , which presents a different view. [...]

  46. [...] Edellämainitusta selostuslähtökohdasta useimmat bloggaajat kuitenkin lähtevät liikkeelle, mikä on ymmärrettävää, sillä suhde tähän paljon (ehkä liikaakin?) rummutettuun uuteen mediaan on epäselvä. Jos blogit nähdään nimenomaan nettipäiväkirjoina, niillä on taipumusta muotoutua selostamiseksi. (Luin tästä aiheesta verkko-opiskelua käsitelleestä blogista: kun oppilaille sanottiin, että heidän tehtävänsä on pitää netissä “päiväkirjaa”, kirjoituksista tuli enemmän selostamista kuin niillä, joiden tehtävä oli pitää “blogia”. Valitettavasti en enää muista, mikä blogi oli kyseessä, joten se siitä “auktoriteettiin vetoamisesta” ) [...]

  47. [...] Publishing 2.0 » Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media Says: January 13th, 2006 at 12:15 am [...]

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  49. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media ” Publishing 2.0 Old Media has hindered itself by avoiding real innovation. … Online Advertising (48) Online Journalism (6) Online Publishing (16) Online Video (1) … [...]

  50. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media ” Publishing 2.0 Old Media has hindered itself by avoiding real innovation. … s Internet Blog ” Yahoo?s counterproductive pyramidPublishing 2.0 ” Bloggers … [...]

  51. [...] Bloggers Are So Wrong About Media ” Publishing 2.0 Old Media has hindered itself by avoiding real innovation. … s Internet Blog ” Yahoo?s counterproductive pyramidPublishing 2.0 ” Bloggers … [...]

  52. [...] nagging feeling that something wasn’t right — I knew it had to do with the problem of too much choice and with the unclear returns on the effort of 2.0 participation. But despite much writing and [...]

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