May 25th, 2006

Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?

by

Guy Kawasaki held a focus group with six teenagers — this is a small sample, of course, but their view of MySpace is telling:

Two panelists were MySpace users. The others expressed a certain backlash and purposeful resistance to the addiction of MySpace. One 14 year old used to be an active MySpace user but stopped after the police came to her school to warn the students about various dangers lurking there.

This points to two key MySpace vulnerabilities (among many):

1. When a fad becomes overhyped, teens will eventually retreat
2. Most teens know that MySpace isn’t entirely safe

After reading this, I went to check out MySpace’s latest Alexa chart:

MySpace Traffic May 23 2006

Could it be that MySpace peaked in April? The traffic chart sure looks a dot com stock chart circa April 2000 — the run up always looks like it will never end…until it does.

Come to think of it, Facebook is looking kind of downish, too:

Facebook Traffic May 23 2006

Well, anyway, just wondering.

UPDATE

David Krug and others think the MySpace dip is cyclical, driven by spring break, finals, etc. Well, hmmm. Most spring breaks fall in March or early April — so it appears that extra free time drove MySpace to its peak — and then what? Studiousness swept the land as people got an early jump on studying for finals in mid April? And wouldn’t there have been a similar seasonal downturn last year?

MySpace Traffic May 24 2006 - Two Years

Yeah, seasonality, that’s go to be it. And that’s right, I have fallen out of touch with teenage psychology. I forgot how conformist teenagers are — of course they will continue to embrace MySpace now that’s gone totally mainstream. It’s totally hip to do what everyone else is doing.

Given David’s brilliant seasonal theory, I wonder when we should see the sharp upturn as everyone finds time to rush back to MySpace.

UPDATE #2

I’ve been told that I’m “so out of touch with this age group,” so I’m bringing in an outside expert (from “For Teens, MySpace.com Is Just So Last Year“) — “Amanda Lenhart, a senior researcher for the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Lenhart has studied teens’ online behavior since the late 1990s”:

“Teens will go where their friends go,” she said. “They’re always looking for new places to gather. If those places become viewed as more regulated, they’ll move on.”

This is my favorite observation:

Teens like Larios are increasingly finding other social networks that meet their needs — and that aren’t as well known to their parents.

MySpace’s notoriety could be a turnoff for young people who are looking for an online community of their own

Parents know all about MySpace — yeah, that really makes it a long-term winner for teens.

UPDATE #3

Since I can’t respond to this Bloggers Blog post on their site, I’ll do so here. It looks like they got their apples and oranges confused — they posted the Alexa REACH chart for MySpace to counter my posting of the PAGE VIEW chart:

MySpace Reach May 24 2006

So the reach is flat and the page views have dropped.

Yeah, must be because kids are spending more time outside. I guess we’ll have to check back in December.

For the record, I have no interest in declaring MySpace “dead” — just deeply, deeply vulnerable.

Comments (76 Responses so far)

  1. ‘s list/group blog where I was exercising very similar “bah humbug” thoughts about the ‘business/social networking’ phase. At least I’m consistently quizzical, and consistent too in still using LinkedIn ;) Update 3: Just seen this post on Publishing2.0 citing some Alexa charts, some qualitative research and a similar vein of cynicism to my own (!) suggesting that MySpace may have peaked. Glad to see I’m not the only doubter.

  2. Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?

  3. the fray. You wonder how many Vonage customers took advantage of the “opportunity” to buy into the IPO on the belief that a company offering low prices would equate to a good investment. Finally, one of the most intriguing notions of the week is Scott Karp’s contention that the downturn of MySpace has started. Scott’s thesis is based on Alexa data and chats with people who study how teenagers behave (if that’s even possible!). Mathew Ingram has a nice take on Scott’s idea. He agrees with Stowe Boyd that MySpace is

  4. Publishing 2.0 » Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?

  5. Publishing 2.0 » Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?

  6. Publishing 2.0 Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?

  7. MySpace Downturn Talk is Premature [IMG MySpace]MySpace.com has passed the 80 million mark if its member profile count is accurate. They currently list 80,689,975 profiles. Publishing 2.0 has a post asking if a MySpace downturn has begun. Publishing 2.0 also posts this Alexa graphic which shows a dip in MySpace traffic. However, this six month Alexa graphic from today (see below) shows more of a leveling off over the last couple months than a

  8. [IMG Myspacepause]All good things stop growing at triple-digit rates at some point. Now there are some rumblings that MySpace might have peaked. As Scott Karp points out, this Alexa graph suggests that, at the very least, it could be pausing for a breather. He also cites as evidence of a backlash a panel of six teenagers who no longer think it is the coolest thing on the planet.

  9. post asking if a MySpace downturn has begun. Publishing 2.0 also posts this Alexa graphic which shows a dip in MySpace traffic. http://www.bloggersblog.com/cgi-bin/bloggersblog.pl?bblog=526061 Randy: Sometimes, the best people to ask are the teenagers.

  10. MySpace falling? By Mike Orren From the indispensible (to media junkies) Publishing 2.0 blog: …Two key MySpace vulnerabilities (among many): 1. When a fad becomes overhyped, teens will eventually retreat 2. Most teens know that MySpace isn’t entirely safe Heh. I’d add: 3. The damn thing is broke half the time and I’m tired of looking

  11. Has the Myspace downturn begun?

  12. soon, although their AU and non US localisation strategy is yet TBC.” J.D. Amer writes, “In 5 years no one will talk about MySpace or Facebook unless they drastically change their focus.” Update: We are updating this because Publishing 2.0 points out that we have our apples and oranges confused and we most certainly do. The above graphic shows only the REACH from Alexa. Here is the graphic that shows Pageviews for the same time period. [IMG]

  13. I am getting more and more convinced that nobody really understands the nature, source, and drivers of MySpace’s traffic. There have been earlier discussions on the topic. Now, Scott Karp’s offering some statistics supporting an apparent peak in April in MySpace traffic. [IMG Myspace_alexa_may_23_2006] There’s also been anecdotal talk of teen’s stated exodus to new sites like Bebo.com, in the press, as well as the blogsphere. Nick Carr has effectively called the beginning of the end.

  14. And speaking of RUPERT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, what if His GREATEST TRIUMPH YET tanks? (Via The Blog Herald)

  15. !!! A new trend in Social Networking seems to indicate MySpace finally succumbing to negative press and perhaps boredom as the “fad” aspect begins to wear off. Publishing 2.0 takes it on the chin with “Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?” A few excerpts: Guy Kawasaki held a focus group with six teenagers – this is a small sample, of course, but their view of MySpace is telling: Two panelists were MySpace users. The others expressed a certain backlash and purposeful resistance to the

  16. Publishing 2.0 » Has the MySpace Downturn Begun? (07:32 GMT)

  17. caps start showing up), the trendsetters head for the exits, and the crowd soon follows. There’s another shard of anecdotal evidence that the MySpace backlash may have begun, with kids choosing to congregate at newer sites like Bebo. And Scott Karp offers some statistical evidence that MySpace traffic may have peaked. (Some believe the numbers simply point to a seasonality in demand, which would itself be interesting.) I’m not ready to write my “The death of MySpace” post quite yet, but I’m keeping the

  18. whether the MySpace fizzle has begun. I don’t know, but I still say that the issue for MySpace is that it isn’t really my space; it’s their space. My thinking exactly! But what’s really important is to note is what Scott has to say about the vulnerabilities of MySpace This points to two key MySpace vulnerabilities (among many): When a fad becomes overhyped, teens will eventually retreat Most teens know that MySpace isn’t entirely safe and I forgot how conformist teenagers are — of course they will

  19. Shopping cart plugin for WordPress | Semiologic Apache directives Safety Tips Bebo Technology News: Internet : For Teens, MySpace.com Is Just So Last Year Publishing 2.0 » MySpace Is a Ticking Time Bomb Publishing 2.0 » Has the MySpace Downturn Begun? More… [RSS]

  20. Rupert Murdoch is just about to enter into a rather large economics experiment quantifying the “switching costs” of college students in the social network arena. Reports that Murdoch’s My Space is loosing altitude have begun to circulate in the blogosphere. The conventional wisdom is that My Space dominates in the social network race for the same reason that Google dominates in search: they both benefit from a new version of

  21. Has the MySpace Downturn Begun? (publishing2.com) Remember MySpace? (roughtype.com) For Teens, MySpace.com Is Just So Last Year (technewsworld.com) myspace.com Home Page (myspace.com) bebo.com Home Page (bebo.com) Tales From Packaging Hell

  22. Latest Links Has the MySpace Downturn Begun? (via The New York Times) Harvard to Create its Own Privately-Funded Stem Cell Lines Federal funding? We don’t need no stinking federal funding! (via Slashdot) Freehand, GoLive Discontinued Gee, like you couldn

  23. The problem with all the discussion of MySpace, is it over and where will the ‘kids’ go … is the focus on the ‘kids.’ The kids are not the only folks interested in social media and networking. There are more than a few of us in our 40s and older who are doing this

  24. http://www.buzzmachine.com/index.php/2006/06/10/konvention/ http://dailykos.com/ http://www.blogads.com/lptebjmzlptdpn/dailykospremium/advertise http://www.yearlykos.org/ http://www.slate.com/id/2143502/nav/tap1/ MySpace? http://publishing2.com/2006/05/25/has-the-myspace-downturn-begun/ http://publishing2.com/2006/06/06/those-myspace-kids/ http://publishing2.com/2006/06/04/myspace-is-your-space-not-their-space/ Lecture: User-Generated Media http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB114964368857673340.html

  25.  米国のソーシャル・ネットワーキング・サービス(SNS)に陰りが?  Scott Karp のブログPublishing2.0がことの発端である。MySpaceがピークを迎え,これから下降線を辿るかもしれないと指摘したからだ。

  26. Tuffa tider för MySpace Lunarstorm bryter mark Making friends – and money – on MySpace The MySpace Economy ‘Seventeen’ Gets Its Own MySpace Page MySpace Not Much Value to Most Small Businesses Has the MySpace Downturn Begun? Under juli sitter jag hellre i skuggan och hypnotiseras av vÃ¥gskvalp än framför skärmen. Därför blir det inga genomtänka rÃ¥d eller heta nyheter – men oregelbundet bjuder jag pÃ¥ Sommartips06

  27. Scott Karp over at Publishing 2.0 (no service mark claimed) points to a panel of teenagers interviewed by Guy Kawasaki. These are tech-hip teens and they seem to think MySpace is no longer at the center of cool in the connected kid universe. Scott also shows a downturn trend graphic

  28. has posted some good commentary as well as a bunch of links to others discussing the issue. And for a blast from the past, check out Scott Karp’s post on the subject earlier this year when he wrote that he has “no interest in declaring MySpace “dead” — just deeply, deeply vulnerable.” Technorati Tags: social.networks, myspace

  29. has posted some good commentary as well as a bunch of links to others discussing the issue. And for a blast from the past, check out Scott Karp’s post on the subject earlier this year when he wrote that he has “no interest in declaring MySpace “dead” — just deeply, deeply vulnerable.” Technorati Tags: social.networks, myspace

  30. [...] At Publishing 2.0, Scott Karp asks if the downturn of MySpace has begun? [...]

  31. Hello It’s called Spring Break, Finals, and All kinds of Summer Nonsense you idiot. You are so out of touch with this age group. Dorkness.

  32. other possible explanations…

    finals? summer starting?

    both are so large now, cyclical stuff will start to set in. particularly w/ facebook.

  33. any site having to do explicitly with students such as facebook will see a significant downturn during the summer.

  34. My kid’s fancy dance private school in Manhattan didn’t get the police…they got a Secret Service agent warning them about the dangers of MySpace! Feel safer now about TWOT?

  35. Dude — you got called “dorkness.” That’s harsh. I happen to think you’re totally right though, as I wrote in a recent piece about MySpace and social networks for globeandmail.com. MySpace is hot now, but teen audiences are the most fickle market ever invented. Already places like Bebo and Nexopia are growing, in part because MySpace has gone (or is becoming) mainstream, and mainstream is the kiss of death. Rupert had better hurry up and find a way of monetizing that thing before it joins Friendster in the dustbin of history.

  36. [...] There’s a pretty good write up on publishing 2.0 about the fall of MySpace. I don’t agree with the rejection of seasonality as a factor, but I do think that certain signs point to a downturn. Seasonality is a factor, it’s spring people at college are onine less, that’s just a fact. The argument that it wasn’t a factor last year is misguided. MySpace’s penetration in the college market is much higher than it was at this time last year (okay it’s just bigger in general), isn’t it possible that the new users that were added are more of the trend-following-less-loyal type of user, not the always-on-no-matter-what-time-or-day it is early-adopter? The same thing happened with facebook’s herd of college students last year. Facebook’s data from when it was thefacebook is no longer available through alexa, but it went through a huge downturn when schools let out – the same trend seems to be starting up again (weekly traffic rank 66, 3 month avg. 55). [...]

  37. Yep, Matthew is dead-on. It’s almost impossible to create a fad-resistant brand, especially if your demographic is teens. It’s definitely going to take an alternative service to unseat MySpace as there’s still a clear need for what MySpace does for people, but we’re getting to the point now where those services exist and people are finding out about them.

    Part of what’s bad about experiencing a long, awesome increase in traffic like MySpace has is that you get cocky. You don’t update things that need updating, you don’t lock down things that need locking down. You kind of just do what you can and ride the wave. Every major competitor of MySpace has been doing a lot more than that for the last year, so theoretically, minus the audience, these competitors are already in better shape.

  38. I think this is a bit presumptuous. If you look at the traffic patterns of all top 5 web properties including MSN, Yahoo, Ebay, and even Google, you will see that they ALL take a down turn in late may and into the summer. We see this in the online ad biz every year around this time. The weather warms up, people are out of school, they are on vacation, they are outside…its a seasonal trend that happens every year. I know everyone is very anxious to declare MySpace dead, but this is a bit of a reach.

  39. [...] Scott Karp and David Krug debate the MySpace downturn. [...]

  40. But cmon…Scott has to push his ‘MySpace is a time bomb’ orthodoxy to counter all the Web 2.0 orthodoxy! Those durned kids and their advertising-unfriendly social network anyhow.

  41. That’s right, Sebastian, every hype machine needs an anti-hype machine — and granted, it’s a whole lot easier to be iconoclastic than to keep the statue from falling off the pedestal.

  42. You’re intuitive and asking good questions. But you shouldn’t trust Alexa with a ten-foot pool. Alexa’s great, it’s free — but it represents Alexa users, not Internet users. And who the heck puts Alexa toolbars in their browsers???

    I checked MySpace traffic usage data as estimated by Hitwise U.S. usage data, and the dip you see with Alex is not present. Then again, I was only looking at U.S. usage data. There, in fact, could be a dip outside of the U.S., but it’s a very U.S.-centric site. Back to my original point: Alexa is great and it’s free, but it represents Alexa users.

  43. Max, right on about Alexa. The impetus for the post was the teen focus group — I just threw in the Alexa chart for fun — but of course you know how it is with pictures.

    You’ll notice that most of the MySpace defenders focused on the chart and explanations about seasonality, etc. But no one’s denying the substantive issues that point to MySpace’s vulnerabilities.

  44. Jeez David, I certainly have my disagreements with Scott, but don’t you think that’s a bit harsh?

  45. [...] Scott Karp is trying to time the market with MySpace, and I think the downturn has begun: [from Publishing 2.0: Has the MySpace Downturn Begun?] [...]

  46. Anyone ever thing this might have something to do with the weather is nice and people are outside enjoying their REAL lives? Just a thought.

  47. I don’t believe the dip is cyclical. If it was, there would have been a sharp rise in Aug/Sept as the kids came back to school. I don’t have a better explanation other than this is more of a levelling off than a drop. Aren’t all the kids on myspace already?

  48. I’m not a teen. I’m in my 30s, active in local music (which is what got me stuck on MySpace int he first place), and let me tell ya – even among my peers (20-40s) MySpace usage is way, way down. I see fewer people online, fewer blogs, way fewer emails from friends, and fewer bulletins (thank God for the respite from surveys).

    MySpace has peaked. It has hit a wall that is a combination of people realizing it’s not really that cool after all, and (most importantly) the incredible frustration one feels when MySpace craps out – an almost daily occurrence.

    You can’t have one of the biggest sites on the internet if it’s down several times a week. Instead of rushing to add useless features, they should have been strengthening their infrastructure. Now they will pay for that mistake, just like Friendster before them.

  49. [...] Publishing 2.0 has the story and charts. Could it be that MySpace peaked in April? The traffic chart sure looks a dot com stock chart circa April 2000 — the run up always looks like it will never end…until it does. [...]

  50. I am very reluctant to make any comments on statistics provided by Alexa. If you pay attention to how Alexa gets statistics, you will realize that their data is not that reliable. In market research terms, let’s just say that Alexa’s representativeness is at best questionable (personnaly, I believe that there is a lot of manipulation of Alexa statistics since panellists are self-selected). I hope that Hitwise, which has much more reliable data, will release some stats about MySpace in the near future.

    That being said, MySpace may have reached its peak, at least in the US. Analysts should keep in mind though that International markets are just starting to be unsing social networks, which might change the game.

  51. [...] As Scott Karp points out, this Alexa graph suggests that, at the very least, it could be pausing for a breather.  He also cites as anecdotal evidence of a backlash a panel of six teenagers who no longer think it is the coolest thing on the planet.  [...]

  52. I agree with Matthew Ingram and i think a question is the best answer for this.

    “Do your children wear the same clothes, shoes, hairstyles to school that you did?”

  53. [...] Everyone is talking about Scott Karp’s article questioning whether MySpace is experiencing a downturn. There is a lot of anecdotal evidence both from Karp and others, but I think the strongest argument for the MySpace hype eventually running out of steam is that teens are always a very fickle market, and they are getting increasingly fickle. [...]

  54. hi Scott! More telling than Alexa stats (which can always be called into question) is the “coolness factor.” If MySpace continues to lose “coolness,” then its popularity will wane (which seems to be what happened with Friendster.) Trying to say what will be successful by looking at teens, esp. young teens, is a short-sighted strategy. We all grow up, we all change. Are any of us still doing stuff we did when we were in our teens, 20’s or (for some of us) our 30?. And teens of one “generation” rarely do what teens of another “generation” do. If MySpace isn’t officially on the downturn yet, eventually it will be. That’s the nature of fads.

    It also doesn’t help that the most prominent folks in many communities speaking to parents about MySpace, and blogging happens to be law enforcement officials. When you think about it, that’s not only bad, but sad. Bloggers need to be educating others about this Web 2.0 space, not agenda-laden law enforcement folks.

  55. [...] In the UK, a MySpace competitor called Bebo has been challenging the king for the top spot in traffic, says The Guardian. Scott Karp has been asking whether the MySpace fizzle has begun. I don’t know, but I still say that the issue for MySpace is that it isn’t really my space; it’s their space. And that’s weak glue. [...]

  56. [...] Scott Karp over at Publishing 2.0 (no service mark claimed) points to a panel of teenagers interviewed by Guy Kawasaki. These are tech-hip teens and they seem to think MySpace is no longer at the center of cool in the connected kid universe. Scott also shows a downturn trend graphic which may be attributed to spring break or final examines or maybe even spring fever. [...]

  57. [...] [...]

  58. Dude – I’m usually the first to argue that MYSPACE won’t last forever BUT …. pageviews are a totally false place to look for that trend.

    Spring-break-Spring-shmake, the downward trend coincides with the MYSPACE IM launch – if you understand MYSPACE, you will expect PV’s to be canobilized by IM because most MYSPACE pages are “chats” – so, an “offline” chat channel in the MYSPACE community means that (some of) the conversation moves off the web-pages and into IM. The reach curve above seems to support this theory – it also seems to be hitting some upper bound which may be the big story here. I’m not an insider, so don’t have the data, but to me it looks like the IM tool’s seen positive adoption – which is probably a good thing from a cost control perspective.

  59. [...] Has the MySpace Downturn Begun? (publishing2.com) [...]

  60. I’m digging what you’re doing with this blog and the discussions that ensue so my critique is in the spirit of that discussion.

    All this discussion about teens and Guy’s asked 6 of them? That’s a good starting point and I need to go see what he came up with but it’s just that, a place to start developing questions and figuring out where to go. It doesn’t tell us what’s happening beyond the world of those 6 kids. But at least Guy’s talking to actual teenagers.

    Until we have a clear demographic breakdown of Alexa’s installed base, it seems totally nuts to think that it would have any strong relationship to teen usage. Why would a teen download the thing in the first place? If they’re on a family computer where someone older installed it, sure. But we don’t know and there’s nothing cool about Alexa from a teen’s perspective, I would guess. But then we’re all guessing from what I can tell.

    But if it is logical that some teens will move on and the older user base of MySpace (like myself who, like a lot of music folks, are still finding it useful) is already annoyed at the tech problems, MySpace has serious problem ahead since I don’t really see MySpace addressing any of these concerns.

    Adding videos that I can’t watch on my Mac just isn’t enough. I get the feeling that they’re focusing on the monetization issue at the expense of the product and I doubt I have to explain myself to anyone that agrees with that point.

    It’s fascinating to watch, that’s for sure.

  61. MySpace is not disappearing. People love to say this – and even the teens love to say it because it makes them look cool, like when the band they like becomes too popular. Whatever theyre saying, the stats don’t support it. MySpace is still registering over 240,000 peole a day. You can watch the numbers.

    Bebo and Nexopia are not taking users away from MySpace. No one is leaving MySpace for these sites. Bebo is big in Ireland and New Zealand, where MySpace was never dominant. Nexopia hasn’t grown in a year. Check the traffic charts.

    People love to cite Friendster’s demise as the example of teens “fickle” behavior. Big news #1: teens didnt use Friendster. It was 18 & up and teens were barely aware of it by the time it peaked and “went away.” Big news #2: Friendster peeked at a paltry 1.5 million US uniques per month before it leveled out and now sits at 1 million US users a month. Myspace on the other hand, has grown its US uniques every month and is now at a whopping 49 million US uniques. It’s a little harder to disappear when you have 49 million people instead of 1.5 million. These stats come from Nielsen netratings, a professional paid traffic search guide. It tells you a lot more than Alexa, and its more accurate.

    MySpace is here to stay.

  62. MySpace will slowly decline to nothing. Not really soon, but it will happen

    Right now, the biggest usage of MySpace is comming from teens. It’s a fad, everyone has it, everyone talks about it. It’s what’s cool and popular. But as the current teens who have it grow older, they’ll start using it less. And the younger generation won’t jump onto MySpace as quickly. Younger kids don’t want to just copy what older kids are doing. They want to look for individuality from their older brother or sisters. Sure some might jump on the bandwagon because they want to be just like their siblings and such, but in reality younger generations are going to look for something BESIDES MySpace because MySpace isn’t new and hip. It’s so old and what the past generations used- they won’t be a copycat

    Just like fashions, MySpace will fade for the simple reason of the human drive for individuality. You can personalize a MySpace all you want, but as long as the older kids used to do it, it’s not ganna be the same for the younger generation

    -Kevin

  63. [...] Nick Carr emailed me Saturday morning with the news that Dan Mitchell’s NYT column had referenced my MySpace downturn post and that I had “dragged” Nick along with me. “One could make a career out of this MySpace skeptic thing,” I quipped back, “probably pays as much as a career in user-generated content.” [...]

  64. I think your post is very important and that you have brought up many truths. The NET will continue to evolve, and I would not be surprised to see MySpace take a back seat to “the next big thing,” whatever that may be ( a Social Network version of YouTube, Perhaps?) I referenced your post in an article posted to my blog today:

    http://capitalregionpeople.blogspot.com/2006/06/reboot8.html

  65. anthony Punnett

    everyone loves to knock the guy at the top BUT facts are a little off. Look at all the top sites in the same time period, they seem to follow the same pattern….the fact that the new york times is chiming in without checking those facts really lowers my opinion of the paper and the writer (sad)…sound more like a story for the NY Post (a newscorp pub)…and comparing myspace to geocities is a bad idea. Geocities was about self expression but not identification with others, where myspace is about both and has an install base, a consumer mindset and a tool set that are worlds apart. A HUGE factor is that geocities was pre-digital camera and the opportunity for identity production was very limited back in the day…don’t get me started…I used to write a journal on geocities, does that mean that blogs are a fad? (not as long as they continue to optimize google algorithms) there are definitely ways myspace can fail but it is theirs to loose… as long as they evolve the platform. It is not going to because it is uncool with teens… Teens want empowerment and efficiency, just like everyone else…and myspace will stay “cool” as long as they stay true to that theme.

  66. Robert Poole Jr

    Another reason people might be turning away from MySpace is the ridiculous site glitches. Never have I seen a site with more issues logging in or with general functionality.

    It’s frustrating to make 20 attempts to log in and it’s worse to have to check daily to see if things are working on your site. The music and video issues are frequent and now with people figuring out the easy way to spam the system with fake accounts and viruses it may not be worth all the hassle that it takes to login to the thing.

    They just started MySpaceIM but I can’t see anyone signing up for it to use a new IM service when they can use AIM or Yahoo and programs like Trillian let you do both at the same time all in one smaller, non-spyware loaded program.

    MySpace may just need to redirect and work on itself to fix the major turnoffs they have created themselves.

    Rp

  67. [...] The purpose of rock & roll is sticking it to The Man – so sayeth Jack Black’s Dewey Finn in School of Rock. Wise words. Similarly for the Internet. With hackers as its folk heroes and anarchy at the heart of its principle of distributed organisation, the Internet has always been about sticking it to The Man. Users and commentators cheerfully, perhaps wilfully, confuse the probabilistic algorithms of Google (LongTail) and the open editing of Wikipedia (Guardian) with democracy, and for as long as I’ve been watching them the debates surrounding citizen journalism and Dan Gillmor’s "We Media" have taken a (wholly justified) glee in the redistribution of media power from the centre to the edges. My "widening gyre" is, perhaps, just a less elegant way of saying "sticking it to The Man".Now over at Publishing 2.0 Scott Karp sees a recent dip in MySpace’s traffic as the beginning of a fundamental decline. I think he’s right. The virtual anarchy of MySpace was never really compatible with the needs of a high-profile, publicly-traded company to give the appearance of shielding its younger users (WSJ) from the hypothetical harm of unsupervised virtual play. Danah Boyd’s excellent paper on the popularity of MySpace shows us that  children like MySpace because it gives them a (virtual) public space in which to socialise free, however illusorily, of adult scrutiny. The problem for MySpace now is that a plethora of mainstream media articles about the site and its potential dangers for younger users have brought it to the attention of even relatively technically-illiterate parents and teachers, and MySpace’s young users are perfectly well aware of the fact. The illusion of freedom from scrutiny has been broken. Of course, some people are only on MySpace for its original hook, the music. Some won’t care about the illusion of scrutiny. This isn’t – as Scott Karp says in a later update to his post – anything like the death of MySpace. However…an important illusion has been broken, and I think the site is going to hemorrhage users at the lower end of the demographic for a little while yet.Finally, Steve Yelvington opines that newspapers can play in the social networking space. Of course we can. But we will need to learn from the rather expensive mistake I believe News Corp has made with MySpace. This is not a space in which to be (or be mistaken for) The Man. [...]

  68. If to speak about safety of information of course none of the internet sources is safe. So we must watch our children when they use them.

  69. [...] It will be interesting to see whether LostCherry can capitalize on the fickle teen’s quest for what’s new and hip. [...]

  70. [...] Since writing this I have seen Scott Karp’s post “Has the MySpace downturn begun?” on Publishing 2.0 [...]

  71. [...] My old-media pal Scott Karp of Publishing 2.0 has a great post up about whether MySpace is peaking. There are some anecdotal reports that might lead one to believe that it is, including a recent story about how some teenagers see MySpace as “so last year.” This is just a single newspaper story (from Wichita, no less), but I still think both it and Scott are on to something — and then there’s a recent interview with some teenagers that Guy Kawasaki did, which adds some fuel to the fire as well. It was summarized at Flickr by Steve Jurvetson. [...]

  72. [...] I wondered about a MySpace downturn back in May — I may well have been just flat wrong — or maybe I was just premature. An article in the WSJ looks at the problem of MySpace and Facebook becoming overcrowded and too full of commercial messages: “good bye myspace. [...]

  73. [...] This question of whether MySpace might fade in popularity has been going around for some time now. My friend Scott Karp wrote about it back in May, and coincidentally enough I wrote about it back then too, including a column in the Globe and Mail in which I compared social networks for teens to nightclubs, in the sense that there’s always a new one coming along (Cynthia Brumfield chooses a different metaphor that is just as apt: the TV show). Here’s what I wrote then, which is now behind a pay wall: In the end, [Friendster] may simply have been a victim of the shifting enthusiasms of its young audience, who grew up and moved on. In many ways, social networking sites are like hot nightclubs — they become popular and then flame out as the hip crowd moves on, and they are very difficult to manufacture. [...]

  74. [...] As Scott Karp points out, this Alexa graph suggests that, at the very least, it could be pausing for a breather.  He also cites as anecdotal evidence of a backlash a panel of six teenagers who no longer think it is the coolest thing on the planet.  [...]

  75. [...] spring I wrote a post “Has The MySpace Downturn Begun?” Dan Mitchell at NYT picked it up in a piece “MySpace No Longer Their Space?” My [...]

  76. [...] 3: Just seen this post on Publishing2.0 citing some Alexa charts, some qualitative research and a similar vein of cynicism [...]

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