June 13th, 2006

Individual Talent as Media Brand

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There’s another Techmeme frenzy about a blogger’s departure from an institution, but Om Malik’s departure from Business 2.0 does represent an important macrotrend — individual talent as media brand.

Traditional media brands are built around institutions — The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, ABC News, CNN. The blogging phenomenon has made it possible for an individual to become a media brand — even for blogs that have an institution-like name. BuzzMachine, Scripting News, TechCrunch, Creating Passionate Users, PaidContent, Rocketboom are really about Jeff Jarvis, Dave Winer, Michael Arrington, Kathy Sierra, Rafat Ali, and Amanda Congdon/Andrew Baron, just like GigaOm is all about Om Malik. All the brand value accrues to the individual.

As Google continues to destroy the value of branded content, individual media brands may be the last line of defense. Individual talent as media destination may be the only viable alternative to search and social networking as portals to the web.

I say a little prayer for Om.

UPDATE

Doc Searls takes issue with my use of the word “brand” — also “talent” — and suggests, in classic Doc fashion, that we should be a bit more humanist in talking about this very people-centric phenomenon. Perhaps those two words are extraneous, and the phenomenon can best be described with the other two words in this post title — “individual” and “media.”

Individuals are media. Can’t strip it down much further than that.

Comments (12 Responses so far)

  1. (Dvorak, not Scoble.) I take this stuff seriously. People who lie and call it journalism are scum. That they win awards for this crap something for the award-givers to deal with. Link | Tue, 13 Jun 2006 @ 7:19PM | Posted on: Scripting NewsScott Karp

  2. Google’s tv eavesdropping plan “By using its microphone to listen in and then connecting to an online database it could identify the show, and how far through you are.” Tags: google advertising future television attentionIndividual Talent as Media Brand “As Google continues to destroy the value of branded content, individual media brands may be the last line of defense.” Tags: identity blogs branding media2.0 Toilet Calculator Figure out how many hours you’ve spent on the toilet in your lifetime.

  3. Dare Obasanjo – On Ray Ozzie’s TechEd 2006 Keynote Robert Hurlbut – TechEd 2006 this week Career stuff cdnitmgr – Career Tip: Change or Stagnate! — Personal SWOT Analysis for Career Growth Scott Karp -Individual Talent as Media Brand greg – Interview Question Worksheets from Microsoft Ryck – Job Hunting? Get Real About Your Virtual Identity Web stuff Scott Mitchell – Working with Data in ASP.NET 2.0 Rick Strahl – Rounded Corners with CSS

  4. [...] : LATER: On the blogging phenom as a follow-on to big media,Scott Karp says, and I agree: All the brand value accrues to the individual. As Google continues to destroy the value of branded content, individual media brands may be the last line of defense. Individual talent as media destination may be the only viable alternative to search and social networking as portals to the web. [...]

  5. [...] Scott Karp: “I say a little prayer for Om.”  [...]

  6. [...]  Tuesday, June 13, 2006Scott Karp: “I say a little prayer for Om.”  [...]

  7. [...] I defintiely agree/disagree with Scott Karp here. As Google continues to destroy the value of branded content, individual media brands may be the last line of defense. Individual talent as media destination may be the only viable alternative to search and social networking as portals to the web. [...]

  8. >”Traditional media brands are built around institutions — The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, ABC News, CNN. The blogging phenomenon has made it possible for an individual…”

    Megatrend? Maybe. Something new? I don’t think so. Sure, it’s true if you think about news media, but the individual has been king for a long time in entertainment media. It could be that provides a clue about the nature of what we’re doing online?

  9. [...] Scott Karp has an interesting post on indivdual as brand: “The blogging phenomenon has made it possible for an individual to become a media brand — even for blogs that have an institution-like name….As Google continues to destroy the value of branded content, individual media brands may be the last line of defense. Individual talent as media destination may be the only viable alternative to search and social networking as portals to the web”. [...]

  10. [...] ThoughtStorms: BloggingPersonalizes BloggingPersonalizesHomePage | RecentChanges | Preferences Difference (from prior major revision) (no other diffs) Added: 30a31,34 * Publishing 2.0 : http://publishing2.com/2006/06/13/individual-talent-as-media-brand/ : All the brand value accrues to the individual. Context : OnWeblogs [...]

  11. http://davenet.scripting.com/2002/05/13/monocultureAnArtifcactOfThe20thCentury

  12. [...] Soylent brands   Why do we take something new to journalism, to publishing, to personal expression, to so many other activities not supported by Journalism 1.0 — much less anything ever taught in school or anywhere else, yet profound and far-reaching in its influence on countless institutions — and explain it in terms of a narrow, threatened and nearly irrelevant institution that borrowed one of its most overworked buzzwords from the cattle industry?  That’s what I think every time a blogger gets called a “brand”. Or even “talent”, which is another label for what Alfred Hitchcock called “cattle”.  I don’t mean to knock Scott Karp, who scores a two-fer with Individual Talent as Media Brand. I actually agree with everything he’s saying. But I also have to say that what I like about Om, and everybody else listed on that post, is not their qualities as “brands”, or even their very real talents. I like them for who (not what) they are, — and the fact that they are interesting, entertaining, provocative, and putting to use an endless variety of other qualities that have nothing to do with their values as products and everything to do with their humanity.  I’m guessing Scott’s probably with me on that. And I’m sure he’ll get farther in explaining What’s Going On Here than I will, because he’s speaking native Marketese. Hey, maybe that’s even a Good Thing. (Since, after all, it answers the question in the first paragraph.)  But every once in awhile I have to raise my voice in this wilderness that’s actually a new frontier that grows with every post we make. What we’re doing with blogging (and vlogging, and podcasting) is far bigger, far more intereting, and far more full of money in the long run, than the whole damn “media” business it’s disrupting.   Still in training   Back in the mid-’70s, when a bunch of us lived in a little rural enclave called Oxbow (not much to look at from straight down on a late winter afternoon in the ’00s, but here it is), our alpha member was Larry Tuttle, who lived in an A-frame called The Red House. Tuttle (best known, as if he were a law student, by his surname) worked about 500 times harder than the rest of us put together, running a recycling operation and working on broken vehicles, when he wasn’t also running the second largest brewery in North Carolina — next to Miller’s.  Tuttle had other obsessions, too. The Grateful Dead was one. Darts was another. And trains was another. He didn’t have much opportunity to indulge his Train Thing around Chapel Hill. Maybe that’s one reason he wound up in Rogue River, Oregon, after departing from Oxbow one day in ’78 or so, in a green truck loaded down like the Joad family’s Ford.  I’ve hardly seen him since, though we stay in loose touch through the Oxbow Network. Last time I saw him was at an Oxbow beach gathering in NC, where he told me he’d consumed his quota of brews many years back. I guess was why he was still in great shape while I looked like I was in my second trimester. Still, every once in awhile he also crosses the radar here in Cyberland.  Today is one of those days. Here’s Larry, keeping the Yreka Western #18 engine running.   Couldn’t resist   I had to move travel plans around, but I just got it done. New plan: I’m coming by redeye to Bloggercon IV in San Francisco next week, right after the Identity Mashup at Harvard Law, where Bloggercon was born.  Looking forward to seeing many of ya’ll at either or both of those. [...]

  13. [...] the brand becomes synonymous with a person. Scott Karp – June 17th, 2006 | Email | Print | Link Article Tags: Google, Flickr, Web 2.0,Microsoft [...]

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