March 24th, 2007

Can InfoWorld Survive The Transition From Print To Online Publishing?

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It has been confirmed (by Rafat) that InfoWorld will cease to publish in print. Colin Crawford at IDG foreshadowed this rapid transformation. The news about InfoWorld is extremely significant for two reasons.

First, if InfoWorld can make the transition from print publishing to online publishing without going out of business, without diminishing its value to readers, and without laying off a lot of people, it will prove to the rest of the publishing industry that folding the print publication does not mean folding the business. Of course, there’s a big gap between a B2B magazine making the transition and a local newspaper making it across the chasm. But we’ve got to start somewhere.

Second, the first of my 2007 predictions has come to pass. And it’s only March. Google shareholders better hope this isn’t the beginning of a streak.

(Matt McAlister, who used to run InforWorld online, has some must-read observations)

Comments (12 Responses so far)

  1. do think that they still do play an important role and thus have their place in society. They just need to figure out how to embrace this inevitable tectonic shift (a.k.a. the interwebs) while generating revenue. Read more about this trend here, here, here, and here. And on an unrelated random note, other news for this week: The balancing act between pursuing your lifelong dreams and financial security. I agree with the author in that money does not equal happiness; however, I don

  2. andet citeres for, at væksten i onlineomsætning nu overstiger faldet i printomsætning, samt for, at onlineomsætningen tæller for 35 procent af den samlede indtægt for IDG i USA, hvor koncernen ellers står bag masser af blade. Også en specifik Infoworld-artikel sammesteds er værd at læse. At Infoworld går rent på online betyder dog ikke, at alt bliver gratis (læs annoncefinansieret). Så vidt jeg kan læse mig til skal der stadig betales for store dele af informationen.

  3. Has the Internet killed newspapers, magazines, music and video? Mathew: Print may be dying, but the news is not Larry Digman: How journalism education should change Rafat Ali: IDG’s InfoWorld Magazine To Close Down; Focus on Online/Events Scott Karp: Can InfoWorld Survive The Transition From Print To Online Publishing? and Reinventing The News Business Requires A Little Imagination Dan Gillmor Save-the-Newspapers Columnist Fires Back, Misses Dave Winer Trouble At The Chronicle Ryan: Two obstacles to improving online newspapers

  4. Has the Internet killed newspapers, magazines, music and video? Mathew: Print may be dying, but the news is not Larry Digman: How journalism education should change Rafat Ali: IDG’s InfoWorld Magazine To Close Down; Focus on Online/Events Scott Karp: Can InfoWorld Survive The Transition From Print To Online Publishing? and Reinventing The News Business Requires A Little Imagination Dan Gillmor Save-the-Newspapers Columnist Fires Back, Misses Dave Winer Trouble At The Chronicle Ryan: Two obstacles to improving online newspapers

  5. For tech PR pros, this news does mean that “pitching a story” is increasingly vestigial language. PR should accept online tech content in all its variety, and develop new ways to serve the decision-makers they wish to influence. Scott Karp observes … if InfoWorld can make the transition from print publishing to online publishing without going out of business, without diminishing its value to readers, and without laying off a lot of people, it will prove to the rest of the publishing industry

  6. InfoWorld stops printing, Time Magazine redesigns its print edition and fires 50 people. People are obviously running away from old media: [IMG] The big question is: Do newspapers have a future at all? – Change or die is the media

  7. online, i.e. so that it stops publishing in print? Or does it just mean that the content assets can be moved online? If the latter, yeah, well, duh. If the former, could it be that Time Warner is considering following IDG down the path of all digital publishing? I doubt it, but such cryptic statements can certainly make you wonder.

  8. [...] Scott Karp observes, “there’s a big gap between a B2B magazine making the transition [to an online-only publishing business] and a local newspaper making it across the chasm. But we’ve got to start somewhere.” [...]

  9. [...] fully web. I suspect it won’t be the first specialty publication to make the move. UPDATE: Scott Karp has some [...]

  10. [...] Karp also sees InfoWorld as leading the way for the rest of the publishing industry, but that “of course, there’s a big gap between a B2B magazine making the transition and a local newspaper ma….”Thanks to Rex for tipping me to the InfoWorld news first. Rex tracks the industry so I don’t have [...]

  11. [...] New voices on Infoworld shuttering its print editionPaidcontentShel IsraelScott Karp – Publishing 2.0Matt McAlisterJessica Guynn – SFGateRobert ScobleUpdate: San Francisco Chronicle is rumored to be in [...]

  12. [...] voices on Infoworld shuttering its print edition: Paidcontent Shel Israel Scott Karp – Publishing 2.0 Matt McAlister Jessica Guynn – SFGate Robert [...]

  13. They are already at 3 million page views a month and 1 million unique. Yes, they will do very well is my suspicion. The bigger problem is whether they can continue to be a “generalist” in terms of IT magazine or try and become a specialist?

    mukund

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