July 30th, 2007

Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc.

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So I got my Publishing 2.0 feed set up to crosspost to Facebook and Twitter, but I’m wondering about the utility of doing so, given that most of the people I’m connected to on Facebook and Twitter also subscribe to my regular blog RSS feed.

I’m starting to think that this has the potential to be hugely annoying — and misses the point of Facebook and Twitter. I’m basing that conclusion on having come across the same blog post (for several different blogs) in Facebook Notes, on Twitter, and then again in Google Reader — actually TWICE in Google Reader, since I subscribed to the RSS feed for my Facebook friends’ notes.

I just checked, and virtually every one of my friends’ notes on Facebook are imported blog posts — which I’ve already seen in Google Reader!

To make matters worse, my email Inbox is now littered with Twitter and Facebook notifications — I can turn those off, but email is still the one platform that I ALWAYS have on.

As all of these new platforms jockey for position, and we’re all experimenting with them (which is on balance a good thing), there’s the potential for a huge amount of inefficiency and redundancy.

Which is unfortunate, because I was under the impression that the web and all these new apps were supposed to make us more efficient.

Web 2.0 derides the siloed balkanization of traditional media — yet Web 2.0 doesn’t have the wherewithal to figure out that I’ve now seen the same feed item for the fourteenth time in four different platforms.

APIs are great, and Facebook Platform is great, and RSS feeds are great, but the interoperability still seems to be very superficial, more intended to demonstrate the ability to connect rather than to actually enhance the user experience.

To make matters worse, I’m connected with some people on Facebook, other people on Twitter, other people on IM, other people on email, other people on this blog.

I come back to what Troy Schneider posted on Twitter in response to the crossposting question:

one may have to choose between using these tools as a publisher vs. using them for actual personal communication

I think these new platforms have turned personal communication into a form of publishing, but I do think there’s an important distinction here — there’s a risk of clogging up new communication channels like Twitter and Facebook with information that wasn’t really intended for that channel. If you want to share an article with someone, you’re not going to read it to them over the phone — that’s not the right channel.

There’s a very good reason for Twitter’s 140 char limit — posting blog posts to Twitter seems to violate the spirit of that. Sure, Twitter is often used to share links — but posting EVERY blog post seems to violate the intent. I’d go so far as to say it feels spammy.

I know we’re still very early stage, and it will get better. But I do think there are some fundamental choices to be made.

Like what’s the definition of a “friend” on Facebook? Sure, it’s going to be different for everyone, but right now it’s all over the map, which is detracting from the efficiency of the medium.

If you clicked through to this from Twitter, my apologies — I think I’m going to turn it off. Google Reader does wonders for this and every other blog’s feed.

Comments (40 Responses so far)

  1. More Yahoo Search Ranking Changes, Search Engine Roundtable Avoiding Cookie Cutter SEO, Search Engine Watch Think You’re Done With SEO? Think Again!, Search Engine Watch Social Media The internet is for porn [on Reddit], Reddit Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc, publishing2.com Web Analytics Reporting Delay Update, Google Analytics Blog Other Items Google Picnic, Googlified Top Internet Marketing Blog Posts’ Ever, ViperChill Podcast: Microsoft Buys Ad Exchange; Search Wikia Gets Grub Crawler; Search

  2. That “maintain deniability” mantra doesn’t apply to today’s web, obviously. From the blogs to Facebook to now Twitter and Pownce, it seems like there’s now nothing that won’t be posted for posterity. Still, it feels like more

  3. While browsing del.icio.us I found an article about the drawbacks of Web2.0 . The writer especially focuses on the trend to crosspost to several online services. If you want to stay up to date with the postings of someone you mostly read his RSS feeds. If he has more than one platform to publish,

  4. over the map, which is detracting from the efficiency of the medium. If you clicked through to this from Twitter, my apologies — I think I’m going to turn it off. Google Reader does wonders for this and every other blog’s feed. [IMG ] [IMG] (via tmonkey’s starred items in Google Reader)

  5. Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc.

  6. [IMG Visit Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc.] Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. http://publishing2.com/2007/07/30/web-20-inefficiency-crossposting-on-twitter-facebook-google-reader-etc/

  7. Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. Andrew Garrett – Why blog? (to build your personal brand, of course) Other link blogs Mike Gunderloy – The Daily Grind 1197 Other stuff Phil Haack – At The Microsoft Campus Next Week And Other Engagements

  8. Web 2.0 derides the siloed balkanization of traditional media — yet Web 2.0 doesn’t have the wherewithal to figure out that I’ve now seen the same feed item for the fourteenth time in four different platforms.” – Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. » Publishing 2.0

  9. More Yahoo Search Ranking Changes, Search Engine Roundtable Avoiding Cookie Cutter SEO, Search Engine Watch Think You’re Done With SEO? Think Again!, Search Engine Watch Social Media The internet is for porn [on Reddit], Reddit Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc, publishing2.com Web Analytics Reporting Delay Update, Google Analytics Blog Other Items Google Picnic, Googlified Top Internet Marketing Blog Posts’ Ever, ViperChill Podcast: Microsoft Buys Ad Exchange; Search Wikia Gets Grub Crawler; Search

  10. APIs are great, and Facebook Platform is great, and RSS feeds are great, but the interoperability still seems to be very superficial, more intended to demonstrate the ability to connect rather than to actually enhance the user experience. (von Publishing 2.0) Ich finde die Idee prima: jeder sitzt in seiner Nische und ist da überragend (oder kopiert gut), und den Rest des Möglichen sollen gefälligst die anderen abdecken. Da muß gar kein Yahoo mehr kommen und alles zusammenkaufen.

  11. 65 minutes ago Scott Karp / Publishing 2.0: Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. Find

  12. Scott Karp’s blog post

  13. Yes, Scott, using multiple flow apps that are largely unaware of what you might be doing in other apps can lead to inefficiencies. (But efficiency is not what Web 2.0 is about anyway.) [from Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. ] [...] As all of these new platforms jockey for position, and we’re all experimenting with them (which is on balance a good thing), there’s the potential for a huge amount of inefficiency and redundancy.

  14. Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc.

  15. Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. 4 hours ago factoryjoe : Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. – “Web 2.0 derides the siloed balkanization of traditional media — yet Web 2.0 doesn’t have the wherewithal to figure out that I’ve now seen

  16. s ability to export video puts it ahead of other online video editors in my mind. A video editor has only very limited usefulness if you can’t take your creation with you when you’re done.” skriver R/WW. * * * Ineffektivitet 2.0. Publishing 2.0 skriver om något mycket intressant — ineffektiviteten som skapas av webb2.0. Via tjänster som Twitter, Facebook och Google Reader är det lätt att överösas av nyheter. Ofta är det samma nyhet via flera olika kanaler.

  17. I’m here! And here. Oh, and I’m here, too! If you’re on Pownce, Twitter, Facebook et cetera (a full list of places to find me), then the biggest problem for you is cross-posting. Having to cross-post between Social Networks is a huge inefficiency: “So I got my Publishing 2.0 feed set up to crosspost to Facebook and Twitter, but I’m wondering about the utility of doing so, given that most of the people I’m connected to on Facebook and Twitter also subscribe to my regular blog RSS feed.

  18. I was just thinking about an hour ago how annoying it was that I was essentially getting RSS notifications of new blog posts (note just you!) in Twitter. I’d like to see people use Twitter for stuff that is either too timely for the blog, or maybe of interest only to the follower community and not the blog readership. Although I would imagine those communities overlap quite a bit.

  19. Well, it is entirely dependent on how you organize your friends across various social networks. I have many non twitter friends on facebook who also don’t read my blog. Importing notes might provoke their interest if the topic is of some interest to them. Also, cross posting helps in other ways too. To avoid information overload, I check my feed reader only once per day. But when I get a tweet about some post that is of some interest to me, I get to check it immediately. There are some advantages even though the annoyance factor is there. I agree with you completely about the superficial integration aspect.

  20. [...] As Scott Karp pointed out after he got his echo chamber set up: I?m starting to think that this has the potential to be hugely annoying ? and misses the point of Facebook and Twitter. I?m basing that conclusion on having come across the same blog post (for several different blogs) in Facebook Notes, on Twitter, and then again in Google Reader ? actually TWICE in Google Reader, since I subscribed to the RSS feed for my Facebook friends? notes. [...]

  21. I find posts from blogs to be clutter on Twitter.

    However, well though out twits that take advantage of the tool “limitations” are great.

  22. I use Netvibes to concentrate some of my services (Twitter, del.icio.us, etc). Now I need a Pownce Module for Netvibes!!!

  23. I’m very unhappy with cross-posting features, esp. the ones that travel in the opposite direction from what you’re describing: populating a blog from Del.icio.us / Twitter / Flickr. I’m not sure of the general motivation behind these, but I can think of two rationalizations off the top of my head: self-consciousness or worry about a blog looking dead, and infatuation with technical tricks: “now people only need to subscribe to one feed!”

    I subscribe to people’s blogs because I want to read their writing, not the daily castoffs from microblogging services. The value of a blog is diminished when it’s regularly populated with filler material, and RSS already provides and excellent mechanism for getting notified that a writer has posted something new.

  24. Definitely a problem when you’re ‘too nice’ to someone and offend them. Someone brought that up today in the newsroom – story about a satellite company repeatedly calling him on his cellphone to see how he liked his service. After he told them to stop calling. Trying to do ‘good customer service’ actually hurt the company. I think sometimes each site should have it’s own post – because I for one use different social media sites for different things.

    Depends also, I guess, on whether or not you’re into ‘SMM’ (social media marketing…) Why TIME booted MySpace to their ‘uncool’ list I hear…

    -kpaul

  25. [...] Karp comments on the bastardization of friends — specifically, the spam potential as people (including me) experiment with cross-posting blog posts with updates to friends in [...]

  26. If you are thinking of publishing your materials and that they might have some wroth you might not want to have them imported into facebook. While the cross posting is annoying to RSS users like ourselves (I use google reader in the same way you do and often get double postings from the blogs RSS then the Facebook Notes RSS feeds) the copyright of who owns it becomes a little more tricky.

    I have commented on this before and since removed all my blog postings from Facebook. See my thoughts in more detail here
    http://www.christophermercer.net/2007/06/28/facebook-and-content-why-is-should-matter-to-you/

  27. [...] that a lot of bloggers are using “web 2.0″ services to cross-post their entries – he thinks it inefficient. I agree – it is inefficient to find yourself reading the same material via your RSS reader, then [...]

  28. [...] other apps can lead to inefficiencies. (But efficiency is not what Web 2.0 is about anyway.) [from Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. ][…] As all of these new platforms jockey for position, and we’re all experimenting with [...]

  29. [...] joined or plain messy? Published July 31st, 2007 Uncategorized Scott Karp hates mess – the lack of interoperability between systems, the requirement to monitor multiple streams of data [...]

  30. [...] Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc. » Publishing 2.0 People are getting tired of seeing the same stuff syndicated all over the place. (tags: web2.0) [...]

  31. [...] Karp recently commented on the spam potential as people (including me) experiment with cross-posting blog posts with updates to friends (now [...]

  32. [...] Web 2.0 Inefficiency: Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader, Etc, publishing2.com [...]

  33. I don’t cross post as I think it defeats the object of the exercise. I use different strokes for different folks. If I want to keep up with someone’s various outlets I’ll simply aggregate them in my RSS reader, and I’d expect any “follower” to do the same – the last thing I want is multiple instances of the same thing. Business marketing in Twitter is a nuisance, as are pingbacks in comments – just look at yours!

  34. [...] painful birth. Should we be looking at reviewing Interoperability in the Web 2 context as well? As Scott Karp writes it still seems very superficial. Maybe we only need looser associations between these tools [...]

  35. The 140 character limit at Twitter also happens to (roughly) correspond to the maximum size of an SMS text message.

  36. Scott, I don’t know if you read comments on posts this old, but I’m glad you saw the light! Twitter, Facebook’s status field, and RSS feeds all have very different purposes from one another, and cross-posting among them is, well, kind of rude.

    Another recent phenomenon is growing increasingly bothersome, too: Twitter updates on Facebook.

    After looking high and low for a way to get Tweets out of my status feed, my frustration drove me to make a Facebook group. Yeah, it’s silly, but that’s what Facebook is for! And it’s why Twitter updates don’t belong on it.

    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=24858301210

    I am expecting it’s more than just me who is annoyed by this.

  37. [...] Web 2.0 inefficiency | Publishing 2.0 [...]

  38. [...] Crossposting On Twitter, Facebook, Google [...]

  39. [...] web service that lets you send the same message out to a number of social media services (”cross-posting“).  In his insightful post, he details a complex method of ensuring that the right social [...]

  40. [...] on, Scott Karp noted that “Web 2.0 derides the siloed balkanization of traditional media — yet Web 2.0 doesn’t [...]

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