August 3rd, 2007

Facebook Is NOT For Business

by

Facebook’s closed platform and data lock-in are coming under siege from Dave Winer and others. It’s time to call another Facebook foul — the notion that Facebook is suddenly a killer app for business that will unseat LinkedIn, simply because Facebook opened its doors to everyone.

Yes, Facebook Platform makes Facebook infinitely extensible, but the core, native Facebook apps and features are ABSOLUTELY UNCHANGED since it was originally designed for students to socialize. The notion of a one-size-fits-all application makes about as much sense as everyone driving the same type of car or living in the same sized house or wearing the same clothes. We all have very different needs, even across different parts of our lives. Facebook is a fantastic platform for PERSONAL social connections, keeping up and communicating with close friends and family.

But business and professional needs are NOT the same as personal needs. I have no need to “poke” my professional colleagues or specify that our working relationship began when we “hooked up.” I don’t need to know about my professional colleagues what gender they are interested in mating with, or what they are looking for in a relationship, or what their favorite TV shows are — these things may be of voyeuristic quasi-social interest, but they don’t help me connect or collaborate professionally (other than maybe topics for idle — or embarrassing — chit-chat).

You could argue that there’s some efficiency in doing personal and professional network in the same place, but that’s only because of the data lock-in. Why can’t I have ONE profile and use it on Facebook for personal networking and have a DIFFERENT app that I use for with the SAME profile for professional networking and collaboration.

Really, how much more fragmented could my professional apps be? I’ve got Google Docs, Basecamp, IM, LinkedIn, Twitter, my blog — how does Facebook help me? By creating and joining professional interest groups on Facebook, so I can stick my professional life in more silos? So I can see photos from of colleagues from a conference? Hello, Flickr!

Facebook allows me to see who is friends with whom and see their professional resume, but I can already do that on LinkedIn. I can follow colleagues’ imported blog notes and posted items, but I can already do that with Google Reader and Del.icio.us.

What if I want to interact with someone on Facebook for business development? Do I have to become their “Friend” forever? LinkedIn is far better for that.

And unlike my personal friends and family, whom I’m connected to (I hope) forever, I don’t want to collaborate or communicate with ALL of my professional colleauges ALL the time.

Facebook is riding a brilliant wave of hype that has professionals of all stripes setting up an account and trying to figure out how to use it for business, but generally scratching their heads.

Steve Spalding’s Case Against Facebook points to Facebook’s lack of universal utility:

It is not designed as a tool for business communication, it is not designed as a tool that my grandparents would be interested in using, it is not designed (like Google or AOL) to be so valuable to the public at large that leaving it would cut them off from the wider world.

The absurdity of applying the same generalized notion of “Friend” to close family as well as to someone you met once at a conference led Max Kalehoff to declare that the “traditional, generalized notion of friend is dead.”

We’re experiencing friends overload, and it’s a tragedy of the commons. The practice of friending has morphed way beyond the term’s original intention and utility. And that is why I declare friends — at least in the social-networking context — passé.

Steve Goldstein points to the endless non-business oriented, productivity-sucking distractions on Facebook:

But I just don’t get the hype, especially as a business tool – there are just too many distractions. The distractions are the kinds of things my 15 year old can be continuously amused by, but to me equate with watching TV (YouTube) in the office.

Let me be clear — I’m NOT anti-Facebook — it’s a fantastic platform and its pulling the Web into the future. But there are very few one-size-fits all platforms. The beauty of the web is it makes it very easy to go niche and address niche needs — blogging has done this to media, and its going to happen to web apps next. Even search still has the potential for useful segmenting for niche uses.

The one-size-fits-all app is your DATA. Fred Wilson is right to observe that his daughters don’t care about Facebook’s data lock-in — but that’s because they are only using it for the personal networking for which Facebook was designed. Once Fred’s daughters develop a professional life after college, they may not feel the same.

OK, that concludes this rant.

Comments (66 Responses so far)

  1. Best of the rest ? News International’s Les Hinton backs Gordon Brown ? Online ads to overtake US newspapers by 2011 ? Facebook Is NOT For Business ? WSJ of the future will fail ? Washington Post wins APME convergence award ? MSNBC.com creates online ad network ? Can football save mobile TV? ? Jimbo Wales: Google’s China mistake ? Newspaper ad execs must target wealth of online readers

  2. [IMG 52276678_dce587c34f_m] CON: Interesting “Facebook is NOT for Business” post by Scott Karp on Publishing 2.0… but i COMPLETELY DISAGREE. my Facebook network is full of geeks, entrepreneurs, angels, VCs, internet execs, and other interesting business folks… it most definitely is FOR business.

  3. Lock-in becomes a Web 2.0 issue which doesn’t focus on the Facebook for business issue but does draw attention to having all your data locked in inside Facebook. Scott Karp at Publishing 2.0 is more emphatic in his post Facebook is NOT for Business

  4. system Apple can create an environment where users can 1-click install cool applications rather than following l33t instructions. And maybe with an Apple marketplace for application and platform development we can get people to quit talking about Facebook as a platform and start building applications for real platforms. Tags: Apple, iPhone, Application Development

  5. require your attention. To truly engage in social media, you need to be wherever the people that matter to you congregate, even if it requires your participation across many different locations. For more on the subject, visit: Jeremiah Owyang Publishing 2.0 Jeff Pulver Techcrunch Dave McClure All Facebook — Click here to read this on a white background, courtesy of ThinkFree docs. facebook myspace social+media social+networks social media networks

  6. Excerpt from Blogging4Business:-One can’t help concurring with Scott Karp – Facebook for business networking is a tricky proposition… — Delivered by Feed43 service

  7. One can’t help concurring with Scott Karp – Facebook for business networking is a tricky proposition… “Yes, Facebook Platform makes Facebook infinitely extensible, but thecore, native Facebook apps and features are ABSOLUTELY UNCHANGED sinceit was originally designed for students to socialize. “But business and professional needs are NOT the same

  8. Personal and Business Networking: Publishing 2.0 looks at the utility of Facebook versus LinkedIn. “Why can’t I have ONE profile and use it on Facebook for personal networking and have a DIFFERENT app that I use for with the SAME profile for professional networking and collaboration.

  9. to my contacts so that every time I view their profiles or see that they have updated information, I can get a quick reminder of our relationship. This is particularly handy for those wishing to use Facebook for business (a contested topic currently) and need to maintain contacts and acquaintances with references to information that is inappropriate for sharing with an entire friend network. Generic Feed Aggregator I want an app that takes the last

  10. [IMG linkedin] I just don’t understand the Facebook and LinkedIn comparisons that I read at least 5 times a day throughout my river of news feed reader. This one is from one of my fav bloggers, Scott Karp… What if I want to interact with someone on Facebook for business development? Do I have to become their ?Friend? forever? LinkedIn is far better for that. Don’t get me wrong… I’ve been a long time

  11. to appeal to the widest possible market, so today’s move comes as little surprise. But what does come as a surprise is that Facebook has remained quiet about the whole thing. The viability of the site’s business applications comes into question almost daily

  12. Facebook Is NOT For Business — Facebook’s closed platform and data lock-in are coming under seige from Dave Winer and others. It’s time to call another Facebook foul — the notion that Facebook is suddenly a killer app for business that will unseat LinkedIn, simply because

  13. Google Mashup Editor Amazon’s New API Competes With Paypal, Google Checkout Lock-in becomes a Web 2.0 issue Facebook Is Not For Business A new outlet for self-expression: home-made video games.

  14. Whatever You Say, Rocket Man … No Comments More Digital Daily Live » … I have no need to ‘poke’ my professional colleagues or specify that our working relationship began when we ‘hooked up.’” — Publishing 2.0’s Scott Karp says that, contrary to popular opinion, Facebook is not a killer app for business

  15. Facebook Is NOT For Business " Publishing 2.0 End Poverty 2015 TV | End Poverty 2015 – UN Millennium Campaign eRiders.net Training and consulting resources for nonprofit organizations I’m in ur human service agency empathizing with ur distraught technophobic social workerz

  16. Facebook Is NOT For Business — Facebook’s closed platform and data lock-in are coming under seige from Dave Winer and others. It’s time to call another Facebook foul — the notion that Facebook is suddenly a killer app for business that will unseat LinkedIn, simply

  17. the notion that Facebook is suddenly a killer app for business that will unseat LinkedIn, simply because Facebook opened its doors to everyone. Source: Publishing 2.0 Author: Scott Karp Link: http://publishing2.com/2007/08/03/facebook-is-not-for… Techmeme permalink

  18. Introduction to Databases – Documentation for Metrix Users and Administrators – Metrix Wiki Facebook Is NOT For Business ” Publishing 2.0 End Poverty 2015 TV | End Poverty 2015 – UN Millennium Campaign dotproject – Open Source Software :: Open Source Project and Task Management Software Ypulse Interview: Renee Hobbs, Goddess Of Media Literacy

  19. Facebook a closed platform, although some wise guys think this is a good thing, going on to bring Microsoft of the mid-90s back from the dead, and the user’s data is locked In/owned by Facebook . Now, Scott Carp, an A-lister in my book, writes that Facebook is NOT for Business. …business and professional needs are NOT the same as personal needs. I have no need to “poke” my professional colleagues or specify that our working relationship began when we “hooked up.” I don’t need to know about my professional

  20. Personal and Business Networking: Publishing 2.0 looks at the utility of Facebook versus LinkedIn. “Why can’t I have ONE profile and use it on Facebook for personal networking and have a DIFFERENT app that I use for with the SAME profile for professional networking and collaboration.

  21. Personal and Business Networking: Publishing 2.0 looks at the utility of Facebook versus LinkedIn. “Why can’t I have ONE profile and use it on Facebook for personal networking and have a DIFFERENT app that I use for with the SAME profile for professional networking and collaboration.

  22. ??? ??????? ???? ???????: But business and professional needs are NOT the same as personal needs. I have no need to “poke” my professional colleagues or specify that our working relationship began when we “hooked up.” I don’t need to know about my

  23. ????

  24. same clothes. We all have very different needs, even across different parts of our lives. Facebook is a fantastic platform for PERSONAL social connections, keeping up and communicating with close friends and family. Read the rest of this article at: http://publishing2.com

  25. Facebook Is NOT For Business » Publishing 2.0

  26. Scott Karp’s piece on Publishing 2.0

  27. “independent “news bloggers,” “citizen” journalists, student journalists, i.e. ALL journalists” More than doing anything for “social news” (we’ve got lots of that) I’m hoping that it will lead to better networking. Scott’s been at times a bit hot under the collar about using Facebook for business networking (I don’t think it’s the greatest for that either)so perhaps he’s constructively channeled that ire in Publish2. We are, I think, coming to a point where publishers/journalists need to be able to find

  28. [...] Home Aug 03 This guy has a point… It’s not WorkBook yet.. By AdamAdd commentsAdam’s Rants, Uncategorized Facebook is not for business [...]

  29. Scott–I’ve been arguing against Facebook for business networking since I heard everyone go ballistic on the concept at Supernova…but for different reasons than the ones you suggest–

    My reasons: because if you’re using it to find potential employees, you may be opening yourself up to a discrimination suit. Remember, in the U.S. we’re not allowed to ask marital status, religion, nor even ask them to send a pic with a resume, lest it prejudice us against them on race or gender.

    Even if we don’t know now if our employers are googl’ing us, you can bet there will be a way to find out in the future. So, if someone feels they were discriminated against because of something on their Facebook profile, there’s some labor lawsuit potential…

    That’s probably why the Miss NJ/Miss America contestant wasn’t fired because of the pics from her Facebook profile…avoiding a lawsuit.

    Personally, I don’t mind sharing info with the folks who’ve I’ve “friended” on Facebook, even if many of them are casual friends I’ve met at conferences. These are people I clicked with and would probably have a drink with. That may at some point lead to a job, perhaps, depending on the circumstances. And that would be great. That’s “networking.” And it’s a lot less tacky than someone signing you up for his/her newsletter without even an “it was great meeting you” email.

  30. “Why can’t I have ONE profile and use it on Facebook for personal networking and have a DIFFERENT app that I use for with the SAME profile for professional networking and collaboration.”

    I use Facebook’s privacy functions to show one profile to friends, and a limited one to my business contacts. My business contacts can see my contact info, and find out where I work, etc, but not what sex I’m interested, my poetry, etc.

  31. Hi Scott,

    The solution here seems relatively straight forward.

    Allow the user to assign connections with different classifications (ie: Business, Family, Acquaintance, etc., not just Friends). Then allow users to customize access levels to their profile, based on user classification. Finally, update the platform API to allow applications to have knowledge of classifications.

    The core that currently exists is historic to how Facebook evolved, but as the user base and utility changes, I’m sure Facebook will adapt.

    I don’t think fragmenting your social graph into networks unaware of each other (ie: Flickr, Delicious, Google Reader) is the most efficient long term solution, and certainly one that’s not meaningful to a large mass of users.

    Facebook is meant to unify your fragmented networks into one location. I’ll agree that the implementation allowing that to happen isn’t yet perfect, but they’re moving in the right direction.

  32. @Mike

    That’s like saying you use AOL to connect to the internet, therefore you should use their browser, their email, their IM.

    Fortunately, the Web as platform has finally made “best of breed” a reality.

    Even if Facebook develops applications for business, I should be forced to use them just because I used their personal social apps.

    AND…this still assumes that all business uses are monolithic — what about segmenting different business social apps for different professions?

    If I OWN my social data, then I can make all of my social apps aware of each other.

  33. @Scott

    The value and power of Facebook is because of the centralization and peer-verification of identities, which allows it to create a realistic representation of the social graph.

    With the platform, Facebook relinquished control of how apps segment users for varying topics and utilities. Following your analogy, it would be like AOL allowing apps like a browser, email, or IM client to exist without each having to build their own connection client to the internet.

    Without that, you get our current state of affairs:
    masked, false, or redundant identities, scattered within and across many networks (Google Docs, Basecamp, IM, LinkedIn, Twitter, my blog).

  34. “The value and power of Facebook is because of the centralization and peer-verification of identities, which allows it to create a realistic representation of the social graph.”

    What the hell does that mean?

    I’m completely with Scott on this one and am glad someone had the guts to state this opinion. The truth is that there is no need to centralise ALL data, there is a need to centralise data in as far as it’s relevant to the function of the network.

    Facebook can be personal or business, but mixing it is just bad business. If you ever hired one of your friends and ended up having to fire him/her, you would know that.

    I have no desire to mix up my family and friends with my business acquaintances. I want to joke and drink with the first and work and joke and drink (in that order) with the second.

  35. MySpace and Facebook are toaday’s MTV. Their target is 18-22 year-olds. I doubt it will stick with them throughout their lives. For guys, think about it compared to pro wrestling. We all watched it, and we all outgrew it. Some of us when we were 16, some when we were 18, 25, and if you live in the South, maybe later.

    http://www.businesscommonsense.com/story/story.bsp?sid=56176&var=story

  36. [...] open profile movement is finally getting the recognition it deserves. Scott Karp, who’s blog I read often, states [...]

  37. [...] Karp, who I always agree with, has a wonderful meditation (sorry, inside joke) on why Facebook is NOT for business. I agree with everything he says. Facebook is tone-deaf to adults in business. (I think tone-deaf [...]

  38. After having my Google account recently hacked (in spite of a very strong password) I can actually see a strong case for avoiding centralization. Fortunately, this was one of my spare personal Google accounts that was a highly coveted name I got by being in the first round of Gmail invites. Had it been my primary business Google account with access to things like AdWords, Analytics, Webmaster Central, etc . . . yikes. Consolidation of certain areas is a necessity. But I don’t mind spreading things around a bit.

    The more I spend time with Facebook the more I’m underwhelmed and just don’t understand the hype. Perhaps I need to be 22 (instead of a stodgy 29) or maybe I need to move to San Francisco and work as a tech journalist/blogger so I can over-hype to the latest inner-circle tech trends full time. I hear things like Facebook valued at $8+ billion and I swear it feels like 1999 all over again.

  39. Scott, this is simply the best commentary on the Facebook issue I’ve read so far. It’s post like this that keep me subscribed to your feed.

    The recent attacks on Facebook were long due, given the enormous amount of hype surrounding it lately. Fred Wilson and his ilk are always so consumed by the latest hype washing over silicon valley that they forget to take a more strategic view.

  40. “Facebook is for the MTV-generation / 18-22 year olds”
    @Rob:
    That’s simply not true. I’m not in that age-range (30) and have discovered many of my classmates on there, who simply want to keep in touch. I’m sure plenty of older folks feel that way too, especially as their physical environment is usually less conductive to large communities the way school or uni are.

    If properly managed, I believe Facebook can even become a safe email-system, reserved for just those you know and vice versa. As far as that’s concerned, I’m just hoping they release some kind of api for email-clients. It also has great potential as a private picture-sharing place and a private blogging-platform.

    Note the private. Facebook is worth nothing to me as a user, if not kept within certain circles.

  41. Vincent – I found no more than 5 people from my 1990 university graduating class and 1986 high school class on Facebook.

    What still is up in the air is if the 18-22 demographic will keep using MySpace/Facebook or will move on to LinkedIn or just socialize like most people have done for centuries and get out from behind their computer screens.

    I keep up-to-date with my friends via the phone, drinks and dinner and e-mail… novel ideas.

  42. [...] been a lot of discussion about Facebook and its usefulness to businesses sparked by Scott Karp’s post in which he outlines why Facebook is not for business. He is correct. Facebook was not intended for [...]

  43. I wrote something along these lines the other day — specifically, how easy (and smart, in my opinion) for Facebook to become good for business:

    …Facebook needs a three-tier friend system:

    1. Personal Friend
    2. Colleague
    3. Acquaintance

    Each category needs its own privacy settings, and you should be able to apply any or all of the three to a given friend.

    There’s no need to make this into a visible caste system; everyone could and should still be listed simply as “Friends.” But being able to easily tailor one’s profile to the appropriate audience could be the silver bullet Facebook needs to claim LinkedIn’s turf. …

    The current limited-profile option just isn’t enough. But it really wouldn’t take much.

  44. Scott –

    This was a great article; you put many of my own thoughts about Facebook (and MySpace) into words. Best point?

    Really, how much more fragmented could my professional apps be? I’ve got Google Docs, Basecamp, IM, LinkedIn, Twitter, my blog [...]

    I feel the same way. I won’t even get into the number of things I’ve tried, kept, discarded, forgotten about, found out I didn’t have time for, etc.

    If you come up with an organized way to keep it all in order without feeling like you’re spread out all over the place, let me know, haha.

  45. [...] on Facebook: Scott Karp at Publishing 2.0 has an interesting post about Facebook saying that it, unlike LinkedIn, is not for business. What if I want to interact [...]

  46. [...] Now, using this general understanding of the Web 2.0 it becomes a little clearer as to why I’m sceptical about Facebook’s ability to effectively facilitate non-personal digital relationships on a wide-scale. This isn’t to suggest that particular businesses, should they sufficiently leverage Facebook, can use Facebook for business communications. I just that I don’t see this being a common phenomena. As Scott Karp notes, I have no need to “poke” my professional colleagues or specify that our working relationship began when we “hooked up.” I don’t need to know about my professional colleagues what gender they are interested in mating with, or what they are looking for in a relationship, or what their favorite TV shows are — these things may be of voyeuristic quasi-social interest, but they don’t help me connect or collaborate professionally (other than maybe topics for idle — or embarrassing — chit-chat). (Source) [...]

  47. wow scott… really have to completely disagree with your analysis here. where do i begin?

    i’ll keep it brief (you can read my blog for more detailed blather & rebuttal):

    Facebook isn’t “for college kids”, it’s based on whomever i friend/invite into my network. Thus, it’s perfectly reasonable for Facebook to be “about business” if the people in my network are about business… particularly if my network is a work network, and my friends are my business colleagues.

    While they may choose to share personal info rather than / in addition to business info on Facebook, keeping in touch with my work & business colleagues and understanding what their behaviors are is EXACTLY what i want to know about… for business.

    in my Facebook network, i probably already have over 40-50 VCs, 100+ geeks & entrepreneurs, another 40-50 execs & notable folks at Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, eBay, MySpace, and other top-tier internet platforms & startups.

    while i wouldn’t say Facebook has replaced LinkedIn as my primary business networking platform of choice, there’s certainly a TON of valuable info for me that’s business-focused, and i bet i can get in touch with anyone in Silicon Valley i want using FB as well as LinkedIn.

    i won’t go into any more detail than this, but characterizing the *functionality* of Facebook as “non-business” is just so far off the mark… all i can say is you need to let us know what you’ve been smoking so we can all get some too.

    as with your diet, so goes your social network… you are what you eat.

    – dave “facebook fanboy & sycophant” mcclure
    http://500hats.typepad.com/

  48. [...] a lot of discussion recently about opening up closed social networks like Facebook (here, here, here and here). Atom/REST could allow a simple way to share information between social networks. An [...]

  49. [...] Facebook Is NOT For Business – Publishing 2.0 Posted by Zvi Filed in Tech [...]

  50. [...] Scott Karp: FaceBook should not be used for business because other people use them for other things like keeping in contact with friends, and I do not want to mix personal and business life in the same place. [...]

  51. [...] need for the next evolution of online social networking is already part of the social graph — for college students, this captures may different types of [...]

  52. [...] post about it. Also, for those that are into my posts on Facebook, I think you’ll enjoy this article on Publishing 2.0, which I cam across this morning as I was trying to catch up on my blog reading. I do miss [...]

  53. Of COURSE Facebook is for business…just like eBay is for business. You can have lots of interaction with people with common interests in Facebook without becoming their Friend. You can just belong to the same groups. And for non-family members, you can use the limited profile to avoid divulging an information about yourself that you think others might find controversial.

    Think creatively and you will see lots of business uses for Facebook.

  54. [...] Facebook Is NOT For Business (Publishing 2.0) [...]

  55. [...] problem for business users (which you can add to the other Facebook business use problems), is that there’s not a lot of utility in having a public profile if the details are locked [...]

  56. [...] seem split on this issue; you can see what others think here and here. But I’m not convinced. addthis_url = [...]

  57. [...] the purely social aspect of the site has been diminished. This keys in with the a whole attitude of resenting (and critiquing) the business networking aspect of Facebook that has become increasingly apparent, an argument that would ring fence Facebook for [...]

  58. You’re kidding right? Don’t you see that Facebook is everything that enterprise portals wanted to be, but never could deliver?

    FB is the portal, it can meet the personalization challenge that enterprise portals never delivered on. Personalization is not putting my local weather or a clock or stock prices on a page, it is about creating a personalized stream of content that aggregates the activities/contributions of my colleagues. Do that in FB if you want, or do it somewhere else, but you need people’s affinity to one another and to groups to do so. FB is designed to let people have affinity to one another and groups, so it is most definitely for work!

  59. You gonna update this? It’s December now, and I bet alot of you guys feel different by now!

  60. @ Mike

    True – it needs updating. Facebook seems to react to criticisms and according to a recent USA Today article: Social, work lives collide on networking websites (http://www.usatoday.com/tech/webguide/internetlife/2008-01-17-social-network-nobarriers_N.htm), it will implement social circles in acknowledgement of fact that people’s lives are made up of zones.

  61. Scott – you make some valid points here, the core facebook service does not bode well for business becuase its inherently personal and people began their usage for personal reasons. Therefore people may not want to expose their professional contacts to all that personal info.

    But facebook as a people centric social platform has a lot of potential for adding value to business relationships.

    The opportunity lies in the fact that linkedin is a pretty static experience and lacks the engagement that facebook provides, in short I find it a bit boring.

    Whats exciting is that the solution need not come from facebook itself but from the development community.

    (disclosure: im currently working on an exciting app that aims to add business value to the social graph on fb)

  62. [...] wrote a while back that Facebook is not for business, i.e it’s not clear how an application designed for socializing among students could be used [...]

  63. Facebook has recently added some advanced Privacy Settings that can help its users share each information (Personal Info, Work Info, Photo Albums, etc) in their profiles with specific friends of their choice. That means, for instance, if you do not want your business contacts to view your personal photos, you can always change your privacy settings accordingly. This thing becomes even simpler when you put all your business contacts in a certain category of friends and just type in the category name (e.g. ‘Marketers’) to restrict them from accessing your certain profile info.

    More details about the changes in Facebook Privacy Settings can be found here:

    http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=11519877130

    [QUOTE]But business and professional needs are NOT the same as personal needs. I have no need to “poke” my professional colleagues or specify that our working relationship began when we “hooked up.” I don’t need to know about my professional colleagues what gender they are interested in mating with, or what they are looking for in a relationship, or what their favorite TV shows are — these things may be of voyeuristic quasi-social interest, but they don’t help me connect or collaborate professionally (other than maybe topics for idle — or embarrassing — chit-chat).[/QUOTE]

  64. [...] blog post last August, “Facebook Is NOT For Business,” as the title suggests, argues that as effective as Facebook is for social networking, it is [...]

  65. It’s true, Facebook is definitely NOT a business networking site. However, LinkedIn is missing what Facebook IS good at… actually encouraging interaction above and beyond just making the connection. I actually started using http://www.octopuscity.com for a good combination of business-centric networking, and it also has a free contact manager.

  66. [...] Here is a blog that talks about business leverage in more detail and here is one that talks about the cons. Feel free to share your experience or other [...]

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